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Why does Eclipse give me the warming "Resource leak: 'in' is never closed" in the following code?

public void readShapeData() {
        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("Enter the width of the Rectangle: ");
        width = in.nextDouble();
        System.out.println("Enter the height of the Rectangle: ");
        height = in.nextDouble();
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11 Answers 11

Because you don't close your Scanner

in.close();
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13  
This will close the Scanner and silence the warning, but it will also close System.in which is typically not desirable. –  Stuart Cook Dec 19 '12 at 5:55
    
@StuartCook +1. Something to keep an eye on. –  informatik01 Mar 15 '13 at 22:29
2  
Why do we need to close Scanner ? What is meant by "resource leak" ? –  Borat Sagdiyev May 4 '14 at 22:17
    
@nogard: this your answer is really helpful.. but when i use in.close();.. again it shows in cannot be resolved.. i have a code without exception handling.. thanks –  saina Jun 9 at 8:45

As others have said, you need to call 'close' on IO classes. I'll add that this is an excellent spot to use the try - finally block with no catch, like this:

public void readShapeData() throws IOException {
    Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
    try {
        System.out.println("Enter the width of the Rectangle: ");
        width = in.nextDouble();
        System.out.println("Enter the height of the Rectangle: ");
        height = in.nextDouble();
    } finally {
        in.close();
    }
}

This ensures that your Scanner is always closed, guaranteeing proper resource cleanup.

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What is meant by resource leak and how will it affect me ? –  Borat Sagdiyev May 4 '14 at 22:21
1  
@Borat - "resource leak" implies that some system resource (usually memory) is being lost or wasted needlessly. Usually this will impact you when you start getting OutOfMemoryErrors thrown during the normal operation of your program. –  Eric Lindauer May 9 '14 at 15:10
    
Thanks eric. I know that you can cause the error by appending a string to itself in an infinite loop. I am not sure how a scanner could cause that error. –  Borat Sagdiyev May 9 '14 at 17:43
    
What about a try-with-resources? –  Dennis Meng Jul 5 '14 at 5:04

It is telling you that you need to close the Scanner you instantiated on System.in with Scanner.close(). Normally every reader should be closed.

Note that if you close System.in, you won't be able to read from it again. You may also take a look at the Console class.

public void readShapeData() {
    Console console = System.console();
    double width = Double.parseDouble(console.readLine("Enter the width of the Rectangle: "));
    double height = Double.parseDouble(console.readLine("Enter the height of the Rectangle: "));
    ...
}
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2  
Note that System.console() is not available when running an application via Eclipse, which can be a hassle during development. –  Stuart Cook Dec 19 '12 at 5:59

You should close your Scanner when you're done with it:

in.close();
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You need call in.close(), in a finally block to ensure it occurs.

From the Eclipse documentation, here is why it flags this particular problem (emphasis mine):

Classes implementing the interface java.io.Closeable (since JDK 1.5) and java.lang.AutoCloseable (since JDK 1.7) are considered to represent external resources, which should be closed using method close(), when they are no longer needed.

The Eclipse Java compiler is able to analyze whether code using such types adheres to this policy.

...

The compiler will flag [violations] with "Resource leak: 'stream' is never closed".

Full explanation here.

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Generally, instances of classes that deal with I/O should be closed after you're finished with them. So at the end of your code you could add in.close().

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adding private static Scanner in; does not really fix the problem, it only clears out the warning. Making the scanner static means it remains open forever (or until the class get's unloaded, which nearly is "forever"). The compiler gives you no warning any more, since you told him "keep it open forever". But that is not what you really wanted to, since you should close resources as soon as you don't need them any more.

HTH, Manfred.

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The Scanner should be closed. It is a good practice to close Readers, Streams...and this kind of objects to free up resources and aovid memory leaks; and doing so in a finally block to make sure that they are closed up even if an exception occurs while handling those objects.

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private static Scanner in;

I fixed it by declaring in as a private static Scanner class variable. Not sure why that fixed it but that is what eclipse recommended I do.

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1  
you muted the warning but created resource leak –  zacheusz Dec 27 '14 at 15:19

In the following code snippet, eclipse warns like "Resource leak: 'reader' is never closed" :

try {
        BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(new File(
                args[0])));
        String line;
        while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
            System.out.println(line);
        }
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
        System.err.println(e.getMessage());
        System.exit(-1);
    } catch (IOException e) {
        System.err.println(e.getMessage());
        System.exit(-1);
    }

but if I move reader declaration outside try block there is no warning :

BufferedReader reader;
    try {
        reader = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(new File(
                args[0])));
        String line;
        while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
            System.out.println(line);
        }
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
        System.err.println(e.getMessage());
        System.exit(-1);
    } catch (IOException e) {
        System.err.println(e.getMessage());
        System.exit(-1);
    }

I am using Java1.6 SDK in eclipse. Any specific reason for this behavioural difference.

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If you are using JDK7 or 8, you can use try-catch with resources.This will automatically close in.

try(
  Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);)
  {
    System.out.println("Enter the width of the Rectangle: ");
    width = in.nextDouble();
    System.out.println("Enter the height of the Rectangle: ");
    height = in.nextDouble();
  }
catch(Exception e)
{//exception handling}
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