Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can one read the AssemblyFileVersion, or its components AssemblyFileMajorVersion, AssemblyFileMinorVersion, AssemblyFileBuildNumber, AssemblyFileRevision, within the .csproj, following compilation?

I have tried the following which pulls the information from the built assembly:

<Target Name="AfterCompile">
    <GetAssemblyIdentity AssemblyFiles="$(TargetPath)">
         <Output
             TaskParameter="Assemblies"
             ItemName="MyAssemblyIdentities"/>
    </GetAssemblyIdentity>
    <Message Text="AssemblyVersion = %(MyAssemblyIdentities.Version)" />
</Target>

But that retrieves the AssemblyVersion and not the AssemblyFileVersion. There does not seem to be a documented metadata entry for the latter. I also tried:

<Import Project="$(MSBuildExtensionsPath)\ExtensionPack\MSBuild.ExtensionPack.tasks" />
<Target Name="AfterCompile">
    <MSBuild.ExtensionPack.Framework.Assembly TaskAction="GetInfo" NetAssembly="$(TargetPath)">
        <Output TaskParameter="OutputItems" ItemName="Info" />
    </MSBuild.ExtensionPack.Framework.Assembly>
    <Message Text="AssemblyFileVersion = %(Info.FileVersion)" />
</Target>

Unfortunately, while this retrieves the correct value, it also file locks the assembly until VS2008 is closed.

Frankly, neither is what I want as I would rather read the information from the AssemblyInfo.cs directly. However, I cannot figure out how to do that. I assumed AssemblyInfo in the MSBuild Extensions was one way, but it seems focused on writing to the AssemblyInfo and not retrieving values from it.

How can I best accomplish this?

share|improve this question
2  
+1 simply for asking "How Do I Read It" instead of what you always find: How to update version info. –  Yoopergeek Oct 6 '09 at 18:42
    
Since it has been two months since I asked this and the only usable answer is my own, I'm going to go ahead and accept it. I still think there may be a better way. –  Gregyski Oct 8 '09 at 19:11
    
@Yoopergeek: Indeed, there are several methods for writing, but reading was elusive even after a lot of research. My answer below does, however, work just fine. –  Gregyski Oct 8 '09 at 19:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I've managed to solve this using a custom task. The class library DLL is as so (some code adjusted/eliminated for brevity):

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;
using Microsoft.Build.Framework;

namespace GetAssemblyFileVersion
{
    public class GetAssemblyFileVersion : ITask
    {
        [Required]
        public string strFilePathAssemblyInfo { get; set; }
        [Output]
        public string strAssemblyFileVersion { get; set; }
        public bool Execute()
        {
            StreamReader streamreaderAssemblyInfo = null;
            Match matchVersion;
            Group groupVersion;
            string strLine;
            strAssemblyFileVersion = String.Empty;
            try
            {
                streamreaderAssemblyInfo = new StreamReader(strFilePathAssemblyInfo);
                while ((strLine = streamreaderAssemblyInfo.ReadLine()) != null)
                {
                    matchVersion = Regex.Match(strLine, @"(?:AssemblyFileVersion\("")(?<ver>(\d*)\.(\d*)(\.(\d*)(\.(\d*))?)?)(?:""\))", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase | RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhitespace | RegexOptions.Singleline | RegexOptions.ExplicitCapture);
                    if (matchVersion.Success)
                    {
                        groupVersion = matchVersion.Groups["ver"];
                        if ((groupVersion.Success) && (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(groupVersion.Value)))
                        {
                            strAssemblyFileVersion = groupVersion.Value;
                            break;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                BuildMessageEventArgs args = new BuildMessageEventArgs(e.Message, string.Empty, "GetAssemblyFileVersion", MessageImportance.High);
                BuildEngine.LogMessageEvent(args);
            }
            finally { if (streamreaderAssemblyInfo != null) streamreaderAssemblyInfo.Close(); } 
            return (true);
        }
        public IBuildEngine BuildEngine { get; set; }
        public ITaskHost HostObject { get; set; }
    }
}

And in the project file:

<UsingTask AssemblyFile="GetAssemblyFileVersion.dll" TaskName="GetAssemblyFileVersion.GetAssemblyFileVersion" />
<Target Name="AfterCompile">
    <GetAssemblyFileVersion strFilePathAssemblyInfo="$(SolutionDir)\AssemblyInfo.cs">
        <Output TaskParameter="strAssemblyFileVersion" PropertyName="strAssemblyFileVersion" />
    </GetAssemblyFileVersion>
    <Message Text="AssemblyFileVersion = $(strAssemblyFileVersion)" />
</Target>

I've tested this and it will read the updated version if you use MSBuild.ExtensionPack.VersionNumber.targets for auto-versioning.

Obviously, this could be easily extended so that a regex is passed from the project file to a more general-purpose custom task in order to obtain any match in any file.


Update 2009/09/03:

One additional change has to be made to make the ApplicationVersion update on each build. InitialTargets="AfterCompile" must be added to the <Project.... This was solved by Chao Kuo.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that the regex used above is a modification of the answer by Jonathan Leffler for SO article "Matching version number parts with regular expressions" @ stackoverflow.com/questions/400522/… –  Gregyski Aug 10 '09 at 7:03

If you make the task inherit from AppDomainIsolatedTask, you don't need to the assembly loading from streams. You can just use AppDomain.LoadFrom(file).

share|improve this answer

What about copying the assmelby and then running the Assembly task on the copy?

share|improve this answer
    
I'd like to find something a little more elegant, but I'll give it a try. I'll have to check, however, if that'll work for subsequent builds or if the file locking bug will obstruct future copies. If it does, I'd need to copy to a different filename each time, which is getting even more inelegant. I'll let you know how it goes. Thanks. –  Gregyski Aug 9 '09 at 23:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.