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I want to emit server-sent events whenever the update action in a controller is called (or whenever my model is updated). I currently have a working watch action in the same controller with a dummy emitter:

def watch
    self.response.headers["Content-Type"] = "text/event-stream"
    self.response.headers["Last-Modified"] = Time.now.ctime.to_json
    self.response_body = Enumerator.new do |y|
        100.times do |i|
            sleep 5
            y << ["event: message", "data: #{i}\n\n"].join("\n")
        end
    end
    # TODO catch IO error when client disconnects
end

How can I get an enumerable object that yields/returns a value when update is called? (NB: It doesn't truly have to be an Enumerable; but it does have to respond to #each for this streaming technique to work.) In some senses, I'm trying to implement an event-driven architecture in Rails I guess.

I'm aware of Observable but I can't figure out how to get my observer to be enumerable as required for this... or how to put an observer in the Enumerator (as above) without having a loop and sleep timer.

The purpose of this is to have changes that are made to the database sent to all other users currently logged in, such that each user always has a current reflection of the database.

Thanks-

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2 Answers 2

I created a gem that allows you to "broadcast" events using SSEs. It allows you to push the data to the connected clients from the update action. It's called R4S ( https://github.com/biggihs/r4s )

Example

def update
  #do some updating
  R4S.push_data("key",{data:"data"},:event=>"SomeJsEvent")     
end

This would push the data to all browsers that are connected to the sse stream "key"

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Cool. I can't tell -- does this require one thread per connected client? –  ZachB Nov 15 '12 at 7:23
    
Yes, at the moment. That's why I use the double-quotes when I talk about broadcasting with this gem, I'm simply loop-ing through all sse connections that have a particular key and writing to them. I don't know if it is possible to make many browsers use the same sse connection but if that's possible I most definitively intend to write it into the gem. –  Bigginn Nov 15 '12 at 17:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is not necessarily the best solution, but I ended up creating a message queue as follows: I created a new table ("SSE") in my database, and in the model that I wanted to observe, I added the callbacks:

class MyModel < ActiveRecord::Base
  after_save :queue_sse
  after_delete :queue_sse
  # ...
  private
    def queue_sse
      connected_users.each do |user|
        SSE.create(:changed_record_id => this.id, :user_id => user)
      end
    end
end

Then in the watch action:

def watch
  connected_users << current_user # pseudo for a mutex-synched accessor
  self.response.headers["Content-Type"] = "text/event-stream"
  self.response.headers["Last-Modified"] = Time.now.ctime.to_json
  self.response_body = Enumerator.new do |y|
    loop do
      sleep 5
      ActiveRecord::Base.uncached do
        updates = SSE.find_all_by_user_id(current_user)
        updates.each do |update|
          puts "update found: #{update.id}\n"
          y << ["event: message", "data: #{update.id}\n\n"].join("\n")
          update.destroy
        end
      end
    end
  end
  # TODO add error catching, and on IOError, remove the current_user
end

This hits the database a lot though. It should probably be built on memcached, a mutex'ed class variable or similar.

(NB -- requires threading, e.g. config.threadsafe! and a threaded server of course.)

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