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Should I save a result from a switch statement before returning it? Or should I return the value in the switch when I get it? Is there one way over another that is better style?

With a temporary variable:

      public double xMax {
      get {
           double val = 0.00f;
           switch(x_option) {
                case 0:
                     val = priMax;
                     break;
                case 1:
                     val = rfMax;
                     break;
                case 2:
                     val = pwMax;
                     break;
           }

           return val;
      }
 }

With return statement:

 public double xMax {
      get {
           double val = 0.00f;
           switch(x_option) {
                case 0:
                     return priMax;
                case 1:
                     return rfMax;
                case 2:
                     return pwMax;
           }
      }
 }

Is there a performance difference and/or cleanup?

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It's all a matter of personal preference according to me. Which code do you think is easier to read and/or (again, according to your preference) easier to maintain? –  Simon André Forsberg Sep 20 '12 at 20:39
2  
I prefer the last one. In either situation your switch statement would benefit from a default case. With the local variable, don't initialize before the switch, but set the variable to 0.0 or 0d in the default block (and why use float zero for a double?). And with the last example, you need an additional return to cover the default case (not all paths return a value). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Sep 20 '12 at 21:05
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Personally I prefer the second form. It makes it immediately clear that as soon as you've got to the return statement, you're done. With the extra variable version, you have to look through the rest of the code to see if anything else will happen.

The dogma around a single point of return made sense in C, where you'd want to make sure you did all your manual clean-up etc - but in a world where you have to consider the possibility of exceptions anyway, and the garbage collector handles most of the cleanup, with try/finally handling the rest, I find there are a lot of cases where insisting on a single exit point makes the code significantly harder to read - particularly around cases where you can determine the result right at the start of the method (e.g. "if the input string is empty, the result is always going to be 0 - so just return it there).

EDIT: Just to be clear, in your situation I don't think it makes much difference. But this is the kind of code where single point of return gets messy:

 public int DoSomething(string input1, string input2)
 {
     // First simple case
     if (input1 == null || input2 == null)
     {
         return -1;
     }

     // Second simple case
     int totalLength = input1.Length + input2.Length;
     if (totalLength < 10)
     {
         return totalLength;
     }

     // Imagine lots of lines here, using input1, input2 and totalLength
     // ...
     return someComplicatedResult;
 }

With a single point of return, this would become:

 public int DoSomething(string input1, string input2)
 {
     int ret;

     // First simple case
     if (input1 == null || input2 == null)
     {

         ret = -1;
     }
     else
     {
         // Second simple case
         int totalLength = input1.Length + input2.Length;
         if (totalLength < 10)
         {
             ret = totalLength;
         }
         else
         {
             // Imagine lots of lines here, using input1, input2 and totalLength
             // ...
             ret = someComplicatedResult;
         }
     }
     return ret;
 }

I would definitely rather read the first form than the second:

  • More nesting generally makes code harder to understand. It's hard to remember where you've got to
  • In the first form, you can clearly tell - without reading any more code - that if you get to the base cases, you're done. There's not going to be any side effect after the complicated code; we're just going to return. In the second code, you have to mentally skip over the "else" blocks to work out what's happening. You're looking over more code to work out the path.
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Is there at any point I should wory about garbage collector not being able to handle the cleaup fast enough? It seems like breaking out like that doesn't seem as friendly. –  Bob. Sep 20 '12 at 20:30
    
@Bob.: I've seen a very few cases where it can't keep up and manual intervention helps. But that's literally about two or three pieces of code in a decade. Note that using a local variable in your code doesn't make any difference to that. I'm not sure what you mean by "breaking out" or "friendly" here. Friendly to who? Personally I want to be friendly to whoever's going to read the code next - and nothing says "I know the value I want to return, and I'm done" more than a return statement. –  Jon Skeet Sep 20 '12 at 20:32
    
Does it make a difference the purpose of the property? i.e. Used for drawing something on WPF vs using as a binding variable? –  Bob. Sep 20 '12 at 20:34
    
@Bob.: No, definitely not. –  Jon Skeet Sep 20 '12 at 20:36
    
@JonSkeet The question was about whether or not to use single return point in switch statements. I don't think your DoSomething example is very relevant. –  Simon André Forsberg Sep 21 '12 at 12:05
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Well, the most important thing is that you don't mix them.

One motivation for the first form is that it has a single point of exit from the getter. If the code is more complex than in the examples, that could be useful, but in a simple example like this it doesn't really matter.

The simplicity of the second form is a good argument as long as the code is as simple as in the example.


Your second example doesn't compile as it is now, as the code could reach the end of the property without returning anything. In the first case you can set the variable to a default value before the switch, for the second case you should use a default option in the switch, and you don't need the variable at all:

public double xMax {
  get {
    switch(x_option) {
      case 0:
        return priMax;
      case 1:
        return rfMax;
      case 2:
        return pwMax;
      default:
        return 0d;
    }
  }
}
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It's a matter of taste but I prefer to have a single point of return when possible. It's easier to debug, let you check for pre and post when using code contracts more clearly.

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If you're using the Microsoft Code Contracts project, you specify all the contracts at the start anyway, even post-conditions... –  Jon Skeet Sep 20 '12 at 20:26
    
Well I'm not refering to that library in particular. I mean, to manually assert. It's kinda messy with a lot of returns. –  Randolf R-F Sep 20 '12 at 20:26
    
Right - I find myself writing preconditions manually much more often than post-conditions... and for preconditions, it makes no difference. Then again, if your assertions are going to throw anyway, that is another place that your method can exit, isn't it? –  Jon Skeet Sep 20 '12 at 20:27
1  
Sure, but not the standard result. I mean, looking at the final return I can see what the expected output is, understand the code more easy and so on, asserts let me do that also (even being in a way returns if unexpected things happen) but, instead, having a lot of returns make things messy, for the OP well, no! but for large methods things can be like spaguetti (make me remember the goto times). I know this is a personal taste and that's why mention as first person, but that's my humble opinion @JonSkeet :) –  Randolf R-F Sep 20 '12 at 20:32
    
I'll give a specific example in my answer - I believe sticking to a single return point can actively hurt readability. –  Jon Skeet Sep 20 '12 at 20:35
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At my first programming classes at Military University of Technology in Warsaw, Dr. Eng. Zbigniew Wesołowski stated, that the function can only have one returning point. It was introduction to programming in ANSI-C, but he also told, that we should never forget that, as it is a universal rule, no matter what language we'll have to develop in. What is more, like a despot, he stated that one will never pass his exam, if he try - even once - to use goto statement, return in the middle of a function, or modify iterator inside a for loop.

It is an aged dilemma, whether to return in the middle, or not. Some claim it makes code clearer, other that it is not elegant and should be avoided. In my experience I've noted, that multiple returns most often occur in java code, while c, c++ and also c# programmers rather avoid that. That's not a rule, just an observation.

Another observation is that java language encourages compact syntax. Java IDE's (ex. eclipse) often have default formatter set to put opening brace at same line (just a trivial example). Multiple returns align with that approach allowing further compacting the code.

Visual Studio in opposite puts opening brace on new line as an only character. It encourages clear, bold syntax, with long files, many blank or single character lines. I do not know which is better, if any.

Basically I write C# at classes at university and at home. And then I prefer that long files with blank lines.

In my company, I write java code, and then I prefer more compact style, that I get used to. In company we use checkstyle to maintain good code quality by uniform styling. And through many years of company existence there has been rule in checkstyle that disallows multiple returning at all.

I've seen a post at stackoverflow where some one issued that it has a performance impact. In an answer he's got results of a simple benchmark checking that. And in fact there was no big difference.

In my coding practice I rather avoid multiple returns. But your overall decision would depend on your personal taste, experience, habits, beliefs, and maybe quality requirements.

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I've never even heard of "gentle" programming practices... but this answer just sounds like a vague rant about Java programmers and a practice you happen not to like, rather than a reasoned argument. –  Jon Skeet Sep 20 '12 at 20:31
    
I've been programming in a couple of languages for a few years, most often in c# and java. I've read many articles on good programming practices and I do follow the rules, especially when I have to cooperate with other developers. And even more when it's a quality requirement. –  Krzysztof Jabłoński Sep 20 '12 at 21:00
    
I'm sure there are plenty of checkstyle rules I could argue with. Have you read my answer, with its sample of what code can look like with single return vs multiple return? Do you genuinely believe that the single return version is cleaner? A lot of "rules" which made sense in other languages really don't port well. –  Jon Skeet Sep 20 '12 at 21:02
1  
In my opinion, it's much a matter of habit, not only beliefs. I've always coded my way, which I've learnt at my very first programming classes at the university. I've read your answer and I agree. It may get messy, especially when the method is long. But writing a long multiline methods is also a bad practice. I know in some cases it may be unavoidable, especially in low level methods. Writing a good quality code is a difficult art. And it really needs years of practice to know where certain rules should be loosened. –  Krzysztof Jabłoński Sep 20 '12 at 21:14
    
It seems like you wanted to provide a citation to somewhere that it says that single returning point is good practice, and yet the links you provided doesn't say anything about that. (At least not that I found). –  Simon André Forsberg Sep 21 '12 at 12:00
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