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I'm representing nucleotides A,C,G,T as 0,1,2,3, and afterwards I need to translate the sequence representing as quaternary to decimal. Is there a way to achieve this in perl? I'm not sure if pack/unpack can do this or not.

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1  
Please describe what you want more clearly and show us what you have tried! –  Jean Sep 20 '12 at 20:37
    
So you want 205 from 3031? –  ikegami Sep 20 '12 at 20:45
    
Are you planning on having inputs longer than 8 digits? –  ikegami Sep 20 '12 at 20:46
    
Sorry, I meant 16 –  ikegami Sep 20 '12 at 21:15
1  
Gotta ask why do you want to do this? –  ikegami Sep 20 '12 at 22:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Base 4 requires exactly 2 bits, so it's easy to handle efficiently.

my $uvsize = length(pack('J>', 0)) * 8;
my %base4to2 = map { $_ => sprintf('%2b', $_) } 0..3;

sub base4to10 {
   my ($s) = @_;
   $s =~ s/(.)/$base4to2{$1}/sg;
   $s = substr(("0" x $uvsize) . $s, -$uvsize);
   return unpack('J>', pack('B*', $s));
}

This allows inputs of 16 digits on builds supporting 32-bit integers, and 32 digits on builds supporting 64-bit integers.

It's possible to support slightly larger numbers using floating points: 26 on builds with IEEE doubles, 56 on builds with IEEE quads. This would require a different implementation.

Larger than that would require a module such as Math::BigInt for Perl to store them.


Faster and simpler:

my %base4to16 = (
   '0' => '0',   '00' => '0',   '20' => '8',
   '1' => '1',   '01' => '1',   '21' => '9',
   '2' => '2',   '02' => '2',   '22' => 'A',
   '3' => '3',   '03' => '3',   '23' => 'B',
                 '10' => '4',   '30' => 'C',
                 '11' => '5',   '31' => 'D',
                 '12' => '6',   '32' => 'E',
                 '13' => '7',   '33' => 'F',
);

sub base4to10 {
   (my $s = $_[0]) =~ s/(..?)/$base4to16{$1}/sg;
   return hex($s);
}
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Note: This solution loses information on how many leading zero were present (but the OP said that was ok). –  ikegami Sep 20 '12 at 22:12
2  
Added a faster and simpler solution. –  ikegami Sep 20 '12 at 22:36
    
It seems function hex($s) cannot deal with length greater than 16, right? –  lolibility Sep 21 '12 at 15:43
    
@lolibility, hex can't deal with numbers larger that than your Perl can support, and my post already details what numbers your Perl can support. An hour before I posted my answer, I asked how big of a number you need to deal with, and you still haven't answered... Please answer. –  ikegami Sep 21 '12 at 16:10
    
Sorry, didn't notice that, I probably going to deal with sequences consists of 32 nucleotides. And my perl and OS information "This is perl, v5.8.8 built for x86_64-linux-thread-multi" –  lolibility Sep 21 '12 at 16:35

I've never used it, but it looks like the Convert::BaseN module would be a good choice. Convert::BaseN - encoding and decoding of base{2,4,8,16,32,64} strings

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You do not quite get me. For the translate part is easy, use code like $mysequence =~ tr/ACGT/0123/; but after translate, the sequence is represented by a string of numbers. but I want to covert them into a integer, since that string of numbers is quaternary, each digit can only be 0-3, unlike decimal, each digit can be 0-9. It's like a relationship of binary and decimal –  lolibility Sep 20 '12 at 21:18
    
That packs the string, but then you have to unpack them to decimal, so that's only half of an answer. –  ikegami Sep 20 '12 at 21:32

It is very simple to calculate a base-4 string to decimal by processing each digit in a loop

Note that, on 32-bit machines, you won't be able to represent a sequence longer than sixteen bases

This code shows the idea

use strict;
use warnings;

print seq2dec('ACGTACGTACGTACGT');

sub seq2dec{
  my ($sequence) = @_;
  my $n = 0;
  for (map {index 'ACGT', $_} split //, $sequence) {
    $n = $n * 4 + $_;
  }
  return $n;
}

output

454761243
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if my machine is 64 bit, then how long can I represent a sequence? –  lolibility Sep 20 '12 at 21:12
    
on a 64-bit platform you can represent 32 bases, but you would need 64-bit Perl installed. If you keep this as a string then you can store a sequence of indefinite length, but then may as well keep it encoded as ACGT characters –  Borodin Sep 20 '12 at 21:16
    
There is a problem here in that there is no way of keeping the length of the original sequence. AAAAAAAAAA is just zero in decimal, no matter how many bases there are in the sequence –  Borodin Sep 20 '12 at 21:24
    
That's Ok for me, all my sequence of DNA of one program run is the same length, so, do not worry about the same integer representing of A,AA,AAA,or A...A –  lolibility Sep 20 '12 at 21:27
    
What I care about is the speed of this, not sure if it's efficient if I use loop to do add up and power –  lolibility Sep 20 '12 at 21:30

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