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I try to use data after I downloaded it from an API. Example of my code:

private int id;
public MainPage()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    SomeFunction();
}
public void SomeFunction()
{
    DownloadFromAPI("url to api");
    MessageBox.Show(id.ToString());  //<< Returns 0
}
public void DownloadFromAPI(DownloadStringCompletedEventArgs url)
{
    //code to retrieve data (singel id)
    id = Int16.Parse(data);
    MessageBox.Show(id.ToString());  //<< Returns the correct number, like 14
    test();
}
private void test()
{
    MessageBox.Show(id.ToString());  //<< Even Returns the correct number 14 
}

How is it possible to load the id information after DownloadFromAPI("url to api"); is finished. so i get the right number (14) instead of 0?

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3  
the code you should have should work just fine. There must be more to it than what you've shown for the behavior you've described to be happening. –  Servy Sep 20 '12 at 21:22
    
It does not look like your sample shows actual issue. Are you sure that you are not creating that object multiple times? Side note: please avoid adding "thank you notes" (upvote/comment/accept instead) and signature (you already have name next to post). –  Alexei Levenkov Sep 20 '12 at 21:27
    
Is your DownloadFromAPI asynchronous? –  prashanth Sep 20 '12 at 21:33
    
If I start the program, the messagebox promts first 0, then 10. if i disable the the messagebox inside the DownloadFromApi it's only showing the 0. so the messagebox is loaded before the void somehow. –  iPhyse Sep 20 '12 at 21:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I suspect your method actually looks like this:

public void DownloadFromAPI(...)
{
    int id = Int16.Parse(data);
    MessageBox.Show(id.ToString());  //<< Returns the correct number, like 14
}

That's declaring a new local variable within the method, rather than assigning a value to the instance variable.

However, personally, I'd often prefer to write the method to return the value instead:

public int DownloadFromApi(...)
{
    return Int16.Parse(data);
}

Of course if this really is natural state within the object, it may make sense - but often it can be simpler to write code which just computes a value and returns it, than getting into mutation territory.

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Whether you keep the 'id' in a local class member or not, either way, you should generally have your methods act upon input and produce any pertinent output, without referencing things outside of their local stack. I would go with something like the following:

public MainPage() 
{ 
  InitializeComponent(); 
  SomeFunction(); 
} 

public void SomeFunction() 
{ 
    int id;
    DownloadFromAPI("url to api", out id); 
    MessageBox.Show(id.ToString());
} 

public void DownloadFromAPI(url, out int id) 
{ 
  //retrieve data...

  // set id...
  id = Int16.Parse(data); 
} 
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