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I'm familiar with programming but new to python:

mem = [0] * memloadsize

what does the '[0]' represent? Is it a built-in array?

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2  
its just an array with one element. .. 0 .... you could do [12] and it would be an array of length 1 with a 12 in it ... –  Joran Beasley Sep 20 '12 at 21:30
4  
(Hint: tutorials are good places to learn basic language constructs!) –  user166390 Sep 20 '12 at 21:31
    
-1 for not at least trying to read a tutorial –  Pierre GM Sep 20 '12 at 22:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The [ and ] characters, in this context, are used to construct array literals:

>>> []
[]
>>> [0]
[0]
>>> ['a', 'b', 'c']
['a', 'b', 'c']

Multiplying arrays is idiomatic, and generates an array gotten by repeating the elements in the array by the given factor:

>>> ['a'] * 4
['a', 'a', 'a', 'a']
>>> [0] * 9
[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]
>>> [0, 1, 2] * 2
[0, 1, 2, 0, 1, 2]

Note that [ and ] are also used to index into an existing array. In that case, [0] accesses the first element in the array:

>>> a = ['first', 'second', 'third']
>>> a[0]
'first'
>>> a[2]
'third'
>>> 
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This is just such a fantastic answer to such a simple question. Very impressed. –  KRyan Sep 20 '12 at 21:33
    
thanks, you're very kind! –  Claudiu Sep 20 '12 at 21:37

It just means a one element list containing just a 0. Multiplying by memloadsize gives you a list of memloadsize zeros.

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4  
Strictly speaking it gives you a list of memloadsize references to the same zero. The difference is irrelevant for things like numbers, but it is vital too keep this in mind if you use list multiplication, because that's almost never what you want if the things in the list might be mutable. –  Ben Sep 20 '12 at 21:38
    
Thanks you! I finally understood after jump on the terminal and practicing: mem = [1] * 10 –  Sean Sep 20 '12 at 21:48

This command is conceptually equivalent to this:

mem = []
for i in xrange(memloadsize):
    mem.append(0)
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Thanks! Now that I know what this means I understand what your code. –  Sean Sep 20 '12 at 21:49

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