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I am using an image sprite to define the MarkerImage for a Google maps (v3) Marker object. The sprite image is 100 pixels down the image from 0,0 (top left). Code as follows:

(function () {
    var icon = new google.maps.MarkerImage(
       "//localhost:8000/public/img/sprite.png",
        new google.maps.Size(25, 25),
        new google.maps.Point(0, -100));
    var position = new google.maps.LatLng(39.27, -105.99);
    var marker = new google.maps.Marker({icon: icon, position: position});
    marker.setMap(map);
}());

This code is correct. Yet, the marker image does not display.

Note: I have discovered the solution to this issue. I am creating this question because it has not yet been answered here. It may save someone a lot of time, as it would have for me.

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1 Answer 1

For some absurd reason, Google expects a positive y-axis value to traverse down (negatively, plot graphically speaking) the image sprite.

If you would set a background position of (0, -100) in your css, you must pass (0, 100) to Google.

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1  
The documentation states clearly that: origin: Point:The position of the image within a sprite, if any. By default, the origin is located at the top left corner of the image (0, 0). developers.google.com/maps/documentation/javascript/… –  Marcelo Sep 21 '12 at 6:21
    
That supports my argument. On a graph, right is positive Y, down is negative X. Using CSS background-position, following standard practice, right is positive Y, down is negative X. –  Matt N.D. Hat Oct 22 '12 at 21:28
    
No, the horizontal axis, (right-left), is the x-axis, the vertical,(up-down), is the y-axis. –  Marcelo Oct 23 '12 at 6:13

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