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I've got some code which fork()s, calls setsid() in the child, and starts some processing. If any of the children quit (waitpid(-1, 0)), I kill all the child process groups:

child_pids = []
for child_func in child_functions:
    pid = fork()
    if pid == 0:
        setsid()
        child_func()
        exit()
    else:
        child_pids.append(pid)

waitpid(-1, 0)
for child_pid in child_pids:
    try:
        killpg(child_pid, SIGTERM)
    except OSError as e:
        if e.errno != 3: # 3 == no such process
            print "Error killing %s: %s" %(child_pid, e)

However, occasionally the call to killpg will fail with “operation not permitted”:

Error killing 22841: [Errno 1] Operation not permitted

Why might this be happening?

A complete, working example:

from signal import SIGTERM
from sys import exit
from time import sleep
from os import *

def slow():
    fork()
    sleep(10)

def fast():
    sleep(1)

child_pids = []
for child_func in [fast, slow, slow, fast]:
    pid = fork()
    if pid == 0:
        setsid()
        child_func()
        exit(0)
    else:
        child_pids.append(pid)

waitpid(-1, 0)
for child_pid in child_pids:
    try:
        killpg(child_pid, SIGTERM)
    except OSError as e:
        print "Error killing %s: %s" %(child_pid, e)

Which yields:

$ python killpg.py
Error killing 23293: [Errno 3] No such process
Error killing 23296: [Errno 1] Operation not permitted
share|improve this question
1  
First, are you on linux, or *BSD/Mac, or something else? Because IIRC linux has more complex permissions rules for killpg. Also, can you kill the children even when you can't killpg them? (I realize that isn't a solution; it's just to help diagnose.) –  abarnert Sep 20 '12 at 23:07
1  
@abarnert has a good point. Doesn't happen on Linux, does happen on my Mac. –  Steve Kehlet Sep 20 '12 at 23:57
    
Sorry, should have mentioned: this is on OS X. Looking at the answers, it seems like "something unique" that Darwin/BSD is doing. –  David Wolever Sep 21 '12 at 0:07
    
It seems to happen on FreeBSD 7 as well as OS X 10.5 and 10.8, so it may be all BSD-derived systems. Nothing in the BSD manpages indicates that it should happen, but I couldn't find any relevant bug reports. To answer my own other question, kill fails too, but with ESRCH rather than EPERM. Anyway, I think nneonneo has dug up the root problem; what you want to do about it is another question. (My workaround should work, but it's ugly, and there may be a race condition between the two calls…) –  abarnert Sep 21 '12 at 0:24
    
There is a race condition in your code (although the waitpid makes it extremely unlikely): there is nothing that enforces that the setsid is done before you call killpg. The usual way to avoid this race condition by setting the process group in both child and parent would prevent setsid so you probably have to use explicit synchronization. –  jilles Sep 21 '12 at 12:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I added some debugging too (slightly modified source). It's happening when you try to kill a process group that's already exited, and in Zombie status. Oh, and it's easily repeatable just with [fast, fast].

$ python so.py 
spawned pgrp 6035
spawned pgrp 6036
Reaped pid: 6036, status: 0
 6035  6034  6035 Z    (Python)
 6034   521  6034 S+   python so.py
 6037  6034  6034 S+   sh -c ps -e -o pid,ppid,pgid,state,command | grep -i python
 6039  6037  6034 R+   grep -i python

killing pg 6035
Error killing 6035: [Errno 1] Operation not permitted
 6035  6034  6035 Z    (Python)
 6034   521  6034 S+   python so.py
 6040  6034  6034 S+   sh -c ps -e -o pid,ppid,pgid,state,command | grep -i python
 6042  6040  6034 S+   grep -i python

killing pg 6036
Error killing 6036: [Errno 3] No such process

Not sure how to deal with that. Maybe you can put the waitpid in a while loop to reap all terminated child processes, and then proceed with pgkill()ing the rest.

But the answer to your question is you're getting EPERMs because you're not allowed to killpg a zombie process group leader (at least on Mac OS).

Also, this is verifiable outside python. If you put a sleep in there, find the pgrp of one of those zombies, and attempt to kill its process group, you also get EPERM:

$ kill -TERM -6115
-bash: kill: (-6115) - Operation not permitted

Confirmed this also doesn't happen on Linux.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, that's great. Thanks! –  David Wolever Sep 21 '12 at 16:05

You apparently can't kill a process group that consists of zombies. When a process exits, it becomes a zombie until someone calls waitpid on it. Typically, init will take ownership of children whose parents have died, to avoid orphan zombie children.

So, the process is still "around" in some sense, but it gets no CPU time and ignores any kill commands sent directly to it. If a process group consists entirely of zombies, however, the behaviour appears to be that killing the process group throws EPERM instead of silently failing. Note that killing a process group containing non-zombies still succeeds.

Example program demonstrating this:

import os
import time

res = os.fork()

if res:
    time.sleep(0.2)
    pgid = os.getpgid(res)
    print pgid

    while 1:
        try:
            print os.kill(-pgid, 9)
        except Exception, e:
            print e
            break

    print 'wait', os.waitpid(res, 0)

    try:
        print os.kill(-pgid, 9)
    except Exception, e:
        print e

else:
    os.setpgid(0, 0)
    while 1:
        pass

The output looks like

56621
None
[Errno 1] Operation not permitted
wait (56621, 9)
[Errno 3] No such process

The parent kills the child with SIGKILL, then tries again. The second time, it gets EPERM, so it waits for the child (reaping it and destroying its process group). So, the third kill produces ESRCH as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice investigation. It sounds like this explains the behavior that I was only able to detect. –  abarnert Sep 21 '12 at 0:20
    
I would consider this an operating system bug. Per POSIX, sending a signal to a zombie shall silently succeed (because the lifetime of the process extends until the zombie is reaped). –  jilles Sep 21 '12 at 11:40
    
@jilles: I'd like a citation for that. Also note that kill(pid, sig) silently succeeds if pid is a zombie process, but that kill(-pgid, sig) fails if pgid is a singleton zombie process group. –  nneonneo Sep 21 '12 at 11:42
    
Ah, interesting. Thanks for the investigation. –  David Wolever Sep 21 '12 at 16:06
    
Since zombie processes eventually become init's responsibility, it's possible that if all of a process group's children are zombies, the entire group gets owned by init, and the erstwhile grandparent no longer has permission to kill it. –  mrgrieves Jan 22 '14 at 3:06

From adding more logging, it looks like sometimes killpg returns EPERM instead of ESRCH:

#!/usr/bin/python

from signal import SIGTERM
from sys import exit
from time import sleep
from os import *

def slow():
    fork()
    sleep(10)

def fast():
    sleep(1)

child_pids = []
for child_func in [fast, slow, slow, fast]:
    pid = fork()
    if pid == 0:
        setsid()
        print child_func, getpid(), getuid(), geteuid()
        child_func()
        exit(0)
    else:
        child_pids.append(pid)

print waitpid(-1, 0)
for child_pid in child_pids:
    try:
        print child_pid, getpgid(child_pid)
    except OSError as e:
        print "Error getpgid %s: %s" %(child_pid, e)      
    try:
        killpg(child_pid, SIGTERM)
    except OSError as e:
        print "Error killing %s: %s" %(child_pid, e)

Whenever killpg fails with EPERM, getpgid has previously failed with ESRCH. For example:

<function fast at 0x109950d70> 26561 503 503
<function slow at 0x109950a28> 26562 503 503
<function slow at 0x109950a28> 26563 503 503
<function fast at 0x109950d70> 26564 503 503
(26564, 0)
26561 Error getpgid 26561: [Errno 3] No such process
Error killing 26561: [Errno 1] Operation not permitted
26562 26562
26563 26563
26564 Error getpgid 26564: [Errno 3] No such process
Error killing 26564: [Errno 3] No such process

I have no idea why this happens—whether it's legal behavior, or a bug in Darwin (inherited from FreeBSD or otherwise), etc.

It seems like you could work around it like this by double-checking an EPERM by calling kill(child_pid, 0); if that returns ESRCH there's no actual permission problem. Of course this looks pretty ugly in the code:

for child_pid in child_pids:
    try:
        killpg(child_pid, SIGTERM)
    except OSError as e:
        if e.errno != 3: # 3 == no such process
            if e.errno == 1:
                try:
                    kill(child_pid, 0)
                except OSError as e2:
                    if e2.errno != 3:
                        print "Error killing %s: %s" %(child_pid, e)
            else:
                print "Error killing %s: %s" %(child_pid, e)
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