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I've been struggling with javascript string methods and regexes, and I may be overlooking something obvious. I hope I violate no protocol by restating tofutim's question in some more detail. Responses to his question focus upon s.replace(), but for that to work, you have to know which occurrence of a substring to replace, replace all of them, or be able to identify somehow uniquely the string to replace by means of a regex. Like him, I only have an array of text offsets like this:

[[5,9], [23,27]]

and a string like this:

"eggs eggs spam and ham spam"

Given those constraints, is there a straightforward way (javaScript or some shortcut with jQuery) to arrive at a string like this?

"eggs <span>eggs</span> spam and ham <span>spam</span>"

I don't know in advance what the replacement strings are, or how many occurrences of them there might be in the base text. I only know their offsets, and it is only the occurrences identified by their offsets that I want to wrap with tags.

any thoughts?

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1  
I'm thinking you'll need a parser rather than a simple string.replace() approach. You could certainly do this with just string.replace(), but its going to be slow. Reading a character at a time, tokenizing your string, processing it against the array, and producing an output string is probably going to be more efficient. –  jrista Sep 20 '12 at 22:26
    
thanks @jrista, maybe something like: l = s.split('') then l[5] = "<span>" + a[5] and similarly for each element of each offset pair and then joining the result? I'll try that. –  jjon Sep 20 '12 at 22:37
    
thats similar to my response actually –  anson Sep 20 '12 at 22:43
    
Thanks to jrista and andbeyond I have an embarrassment of riches: lots of good ideas to work with. I was particularly tickled by the regex solution of elclanrs because it's exactly the sort of thing I was struggling with all afternoon. Thanks all! –  jjon Sep 21 '12 at 1:00
    
Sorry I couldn't offer an actual answer of my own earlier. I was at work, and in the middle of testing a massive load and scalability test of a set of high throughput workflows. Some of the stuff we were testing involves some custom parsing, hence my recommendation. Most of the answers here will work, however given the multiple string operations involved, they will lag in the performance area somewhat. If you simply stream the characters off the input string, and at any of the appropriate indexes in the input array add the necessary <span> or </span> into the output string, the results... –  jrista Sep 21 '12 at 1:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I found a way to do it with regexp. Not sure about performance, but it's short and sweet:

/**
 * replaceOffset
 * @param str A string
 * @param offs Array of offsets in ascending order [[2,4],[6,8]]
 * @param tag HTML tag
 */
function replaceOffset(str, offs, tag) {
  tag = tag || 'span';
  offs.reverse().forEach(function(v) {
    str = str.replace(
      new RegExp('(.{'+v[0]+'})(.{'+(v[1]-v[0])+'})'), 
      '$1<'+tag+'>$2</'+tag+'>'
    );
  });
  return str;
}

Demo: http://jsbin.com/aqowum/3/edit

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that's exactly the solution I was dancing around all day. Thanks, you found it! –  jjon Sep 21 '12 at 1:03

iquick solution (not tested)

function indexWrap(indexArr,str){
  // explode into array of each character
  var chars = str.split('');
  // loop through the MD array of indexes
  for(var i=0; i<indexArr.length;i++){
    var indexes = indexArr[i];
    // if the two indexes exist in the character array
    if(chars[indexes[0]] && chars[indexes[1]]){
      // add the tag into each index
      chars.splice(indexes[0],0,"<span>");
      chars.splice(indexes[1],0,"</span>");
    }
  }
  // return the joined string
  return chars.join('');  
}

Personally, I like a string replace solution, but if you dont want one, this might work

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You can try slice method.

var arr = [[5,9], [23,27]];
arr = arr.reverse()

$.each(arr, function(i, v){
    var f = v[0], last = v[1];
    $('p').html(function(i, v){
        var o = v.slice(0, f);
        var a = '<span>' + v.slice(f, last) + '</span>';
        var c = v.slice(last, -1);
        return o+a+c
    })
})

http://jsfiddle.net/rjQt7/

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First, you'd want to iterate backwards, in order to make sure you won't eventually overwrite the replacements previously made, however, in my example it is not important because the string is reassembled all at once in the very end.

// > interpolateOnIndices([[5,9], [23,27]], "eggs eggs spam and ham spam");
// < 'eggs <span>eggs</span> spam and ham <span>spam</span>'

function interpolateOnIndices(indices, string) {
    "use strict";
    var i, pair, position = string.length,
        len = indices.length - 1, buffer = [];
    for (i = len; i >= 0; i -= 1) {
        pair = indices[i];
        buffer.unshift("<span>",
                       string.substring(pair[0], pair[1]),
                       "</span>",
                       string.substring(pair[1], position));
        position = pair[0];
    }
    buffer.unshift(string.substr(0, position));
    return buffer.join("");
}

This is a little bit better then the example with spliceing, because it doesn't create additional arrays (splice in itself will create additional arrays). Using mapping and creating functions repeatedly inside other functions is a certain memory hog, but it doesn't run very fast either... Although, it is a little bit shorter.

On large strings joining should, theoretically, give you an advantage over multiple concatenations because memory allocation will be made once, instead of subsequently throwing away a half-baked string. Of course, all these need not concern you, unless you are processing large amounts of data.


EDIT:

Because I had too much time on my hands, I decided to make a test, to see how variations will compare on a larger (but fairly realistic) set of data, below is my testing code with some results...

function interpolateOnIndices(indices, string) {
    "use strict";
    var i, pair, position = string.length,
        len = indices.length - 1, buffer = [];
    for (i = len; i >= 0; i -= 1) {
        pair = indices[i];
        buffer.unshift("<span>",
                       string.substring(pair[0], pair[1]),
                       "</span>",
                       string.substring(pair[1], position));
        position = pair[0];
    }
    buffer.unshift(string.substr(0, position));
    return buffer.join("");
}

function indexWrap(indexArr, str) {
    var chars = str.split("");
    for(var i = 0; i < indexArr.length; i++) {
        var indexes = indexArr[i];
        if(chars[indexes[0]] && chars[indexes[1]]){
            chars.splice(indexes[0], 0, "<span>");
            chars.splice(indexes[1], 0, "</span>");
        }
    }
    return chars.join("");
}

function replaceOffset(str, offs, tag) {
    tag = tag || "span";
    offs.reverse().forEach(
        function(v) {
            str = str.replace(
                new RegExp("(.{" + v[0] + "})(.{" + (v[1] - v[0]) + "})"), 
                "$1<" + tag + ">$2</" + tag + ">"
            );
        });
    return str;
}

function generateLongString(pattern, times) {
    "use strict";
    var buffer = new Array(times);
    while (times >= 0) {
        buffer[times] = pattern;
        times -= 1;
    }
    return buffer.join("");
}

function generateIndices(pattern, times, step) {
    "use strict";
    var buffer = pattern.concat(), block = pattern.concat();
    while (times >= 0) {
        block = block.concat();
        block[0] += step;
        block[1] += step;
        buffer = buffer.concat(block);
        times -= 1;
    }
    return buffer;
}

var longString = generateLongString("eggs eggs spam and ham spam", 100);
var indices = generateIndices([[5,9], [23,27]], 100,
                              "eggs eggs spam and ham spam".length);

function speedTest(thunk, times) {
    "use strict";
    var start = new Date();
    while (times >= 0) {
        thunk();
        times -= 1;
    }
    return new Date() - start;
}

speedTest(
    function() {
        replaceOffset(longString, indices, "span"); },
    100); // 1926

speedTest(
    function() {
        indexWrap(indices, longString); },
    100); // 559

speedTest(
    function() {
        interpolateOnIndices(indices, longString); },
    100); // 16

Tested against V8 (Node.js) on amd64 Linux (FC-17).

I didn't test the undefined's answer because I didn't want to load that library, especially so it doesn't do anything useful for this test. I would imagine it will lend somewhere between andbeyond's and elclanrs's variants, more towards elclanrs's answer though.

share|improve this answer
    
In my context, the speed gain wasn't really relevant, but this is good to know, thanks @wvxvw. –  jjon Sep 21 '12 at 22:31

you may use the substring method String.substring (startIndex, endIndex); description: return the string between start & end index usage:

var source="hello world";
var result=source.substring (3,7); //returns 'lo wo'

you already have an array with initial & final index, so you are almost done :)

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