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Consider the following definition

let test =
    Async.FromContinuations(
        fun (cont,econt,ccont) ->
            let rec inner () =
                async {
                    do printfn "looping..."
                    do! Async.Sleep 1000
                    return! inner ()
                }

            Async.Start(inner ())
            cont ())

Suppose I want to try the computation like so

let cts = new CancellationTokenSource ()
Async.Start(test, cts.Token)
cts.Cancel()

This will naturally not make the inner loop stop, since I have not passed the suitable cancellation token. Is there any way I can obtain the outer cancellation token through Async.FromContinuations? I could rewrite this using the async builder and Async.CancellationToken, but then I would lose the ability to pass continuations to the inner expression.

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

smth like this?

let test =
    async {
        let! ct = Async.CancellationToken
        return! Async.FromContinuations(
            fun (cont,econt,ccont) ->
                let rec inner () =
                    async {
                        do printfn "looping..."
                        do! Async.Sleep 1000
                        return! inner ()
                    }

                Async.Start(inner (), cancellationToken = ct)
                cont ())
    }
let cts = new CancellationTokenSource ()
Async.Start(test, cts.Token)
cts.CancelAfter(1000)
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Don't forget to dispose the CTS, perhaps by shoving it under a use clause in async. –  toyvo Sep 21 '12 at 12:26
2  
@toyvo Agreed - missing Dispose is bad. But shouldn't the CTS be disposed by the caller (who created it)? Probably after the cts.Cancel() call? (I would think that calling Dispose inside async could be wrong.) –  Tomas Petricek Sep 21 '12 at 13:38
    
@TomasPetricek yes, you are right. I was thinking of a case when you'd want to release the CTS when the async finishes, but then you also need to make sure Cancel is not called after Dispose; it requires a bit more code. –  toyvo Sep 21 '12 at 14:58
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Can you describe what are you trying to do? If I understand your code correctly, you want to start the inner loop function in the background and then, in parallel, continue running the rest of the workflow (using the cont() call).

To do this, you do not need Async.FromContinuations. There is a function that does exactly this and it also takes care of handling exceptions, cancellation tokens etc.

I think you could rewrite your program like this:

let test = 
    // The inner loop function from your example
    let rec inner () = async { 
        do printfn "looping..." 
        do! Async.Sleep 1000 
        return! inner ()  } 

    async { 
      // Start the inner loop as a child async 
      let! _ = Async.StartChild(inner())
      // ... continue doing other things in parllel if you wish
      do printfn "main body running..." }

Starting and cancelling of the computation looks as before:

let cts = new CancellationTokenSource () 
Async.Start(test, cts.Token) 
// This will cancel the 'inner' loop as well
cts.Cancel() 

If you call Async.StartChild using let! then it will start the inner task, pass it the cancellation token etc. It returns a token that you can use later to wait until the child task completes, but since you're not doing that, I used the _ pattern.

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I was looking for a way to obtain the cancellation token when defining workflows from continuations, in a similar fashion as the primitive declarations in FSharp.Core that make use of the internal AsyncParamsAux type. So the inner code I gave in the post is basically just filler. I guess wrapping an Async.FromContinuations declaration into an async {} expression is good enough for that purpose. –  eirik Dec 1 '12 at 16:22
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