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I have a foreach loop that breaks during the loop in the condition of the foreach itself. Is there a way to try catch the item that throws the exception and then continue the loop?

This will run a few times until the exception hits and then end.

try {
  foreach(b in bees) { //exception is in this line
     string += b;
  }
} catch {
   //error
}

This will not run at all because the exception is in the condition of the foreach

foreach(b in bees) { //exception is in this line
   try {
      string += b;
   } catch {
     //error
   }
}

I know some of you are going to ask how this is happening so here is this: Exception PrincipalOperationException is being thrown because a Principal (b in my example) cannot be found in GroupPrincipal (bees).

Edit: I added the code below. I also figured out that one group member was pointing to a domain that no longer exists. I easily fixed this by deleting the member but my question still stands. How do you handle exceptions that are thrown inside the condition of a foreach?

PrincipalContext ctx = new PrincipalContext(ContextType.domain);
GroupPrincipal gp1 = GroupPrincipal.FindByIdentity(ctx, "gp1");
GroupPrincipal gp2 = GroupPrincipal.FindByIdentity(ctx, "gp2");

var principals = gp1.Members.Union(gp2.Members);

foreach(Principal principal in principals) { //error is here
   //do stuff
}
share|improve this question
3  
The problem isn't in a "condition". It's in the process of enumerating the bees object. For debugging purposes, try to "manually" enumerate bees. It's some sort of IEnumerable<T> or IEnumerable. Manually do .MoveFirst() and see if you get the exception right away. –  John Saunders Sep 21 '12 at 0:53
    
Wow, I didn't realize C#'s didn't have a resume on next... I just found all these forums of guys looking for the equivalent. I suppose its just another good thing about a being a VB.net developer. My apologies mates –  Ccorock Sep 21 '12 at 0:55
    
@mellamokb, Actually I don't use it too much myself. I used to work with a rather interesting C++ programmer who was forced to write in Vb.net, he would litter the damn code with On error resume next. Why would I just make something up here? –  Ccorock Sep 21 '12 at 1:00
    
java-samples.com/showtutorial.php?tutorialid=1275 Here is someone using it. –  Ccorock Sep 21 '12 at 1:02
2  
Can you provide your actual code, i.e. at least the actual classes being involved (is it this GroupPrincipal you mean? Because I cannot see that it is even enumerable.). Maybe we can find a more "domain specific" solution for your problem then, which could ultimately be easier than the "generic" case. –  Christian.K Sep 21 '12 at 3:58

2 Answers 2

Maybe you can try to create a method like that:

    public IEnumerable<T> TryForEach<T>(IEnumerable<T> list, Action executeCatch)
    {
        if (list == null) { executeCatch(); }
        IEnumerator<T> enumerator = list.GetEnumerator();
        bool success = false;

        do
        {
            try
            {
                success = enumerator.MoveNext();
            }
            catch
            {
                executeCatch();
                success = false;
            }

            if (success)
            {
                T item = enumerator.Current;
                yield return item;
            }
        } while (success);
    }

and you can use it this way:

        foreach (var bee in TryForEach(bees.GetMembers(), () => { Console.WriteLine("Error!"); }))
        {
        }
share|improve this answer
    
not well programed: list.Count(); enumerates the complete list already, and the for loop is also the wrong way to enumerate an enumeration –  user287107 Sep 21 '12 at 7:13
    
I guess it does not work, because list.Count() already throws the error message –  user287107 Sep 21 '12 at 7:13
3  
additionally, why should enumerator.MoveNext(); return a good value after throwing an exception? –  user287107 Sep 21 '12 at 7:17
    
@user287107 you are right. I improved the code to handle to handle the Count() issue. –  Guillaume Sep 21 '12 at 7:39
    
What is GetMembers? –  John Saunders Sep 21 '12 at 8:17

Almost the same as the answer from @Guillaume, but "I like mine better":

public static class Extensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> TryForEach<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, Action<Exception> handler)
    {
        if (sequence == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("sequence");
        }

        if (handler == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("handler");
        }

        var mover = sequence.GetEnumerator();
        bool more;
        try
        {
            more = mover.MoveNext();
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            handler(e);
            yield break;
        }

        while (more)
        {
            yield return mover.Current;
            try
            {
                more = mover.MoveNext();
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                handler(e);
                yield break;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like mine better also... However it makes more sense to throw exception than executing the Action if there's no enumeration. What's the reason for executing first the MoveNext rather than just doing it in the loop? –  Guillaume Sep 21 '12 at 15:02
    
@Guillaume: not a big deal, but this way there is no return from the middle of the loop. It's a minor style issue, and a little bit less to have to think about. –  John Saunders Sep 21 '12 at 16:48

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