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I was writing a code to retrieve the file in the following format FileNameyyyyMMddhhmmss.csv.

I was looking up the file using the following FileNameyyyyMMdd*.csv (i.e regular expressions) in my java code. However if there are two files with the same initial name for example

FileNameyyyyMMddhhmmss.csv And FileNameyyyyMMddhhmmss.csv (with different timestamp that is hhmmss is different )

How does the dir command work. Which file would it pick up first when traversing the directory ? Another question if two dir command are used in the same code will it pick up the right file on the use of the second dir command?

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Use java.io.File.listFiles(FileFilter filter) method. –  AVD Sep 21 '12 at 4:26
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As suggested in the comment, use the FileFilter class. TO get files sorted by oldest first, run 'dir /O D'. This way you don't have to depend on one implementation of dir (in case they have changed across Windows versions, which I doubt but still bad to make assumptions in code), and can be certain which file comes first.

I am not sure of your second question as well. Can you please elaborate?

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When I ran the code I observed that the dir command picks up the first file in the directory and then moves to the next one right.But, however if the file order is manually changed it picks up the one which is first in the directory from the top. So I couldn't exactly figure out as to whether the dir works by traversing over the entire directory from top to bottom depending on the arrangement of files in the directory or it has its own procedure to pick up the first file. –  MindBrain Sep 24 '12 at 1:06
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