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i was asked this question in the interview. How many virtual tables does the following program create and what is the out in each case.

#include <iostream> 
using namespace std;
class A
{
 virtual void func1()
 {
  cout << "0 " <<endl;
 }

 virtual void func2()
 {
  cout << "1 " <<endl;
 }
};

 class B:Public A
 {
  void func1()
  {
   cout << "2" <<endl;
  }
 };

class C:public B
{
 virtual void func2()
 {
  cout << "3" <<endl;
 }
}

int main()
{
A* objA;

B objB ;
C objC ;

//case1:
objA = &objB;
objA->func1();
//case2:
objA = &objC;
objA->func2();
objA->func1();
return 0;
}

i am confused in class B. Does it create a vtable for class B? which function will get called in that case. can somebody explain me.

share|improve this question
    
The program doesn't compile; the question asked is academic. Did you mean A* objA; or objA = *objB and objA = *objC? – Charles Bailey Sep 21 '12 at 5:33
    
First of all, the above code doesn't even compile, so there's no output to begin with. Don't feed us that. Secondly, there's a wonderful article in Dr Dobb's, Multiple Inheritance Considered Useful, that you can read to understand how inheritance and virtual method tables work. – Alexey Frunze Sep 21 '12 at 5:39
    
Thanks for the article. Its a pseudocode. basically i wanted to know whether vtable gets created for class B ? – user1687824 Sep 21 '12 at 5:54
    
If this is pseudo code then please post the real code and which compiler you are using. As this is a compiler detail question it is impossible to answer without details about the compiler and the actual code that you are feeding to the compiler. This completely independent of whether the question is asked at interview or not. – Charles Bailey Sep 21 '12 at 6:21
    
I have edited the code. On any compiler this should give the same output anyways. – user1687824 Sep 21 '12 at 7:45
up vote 1 down vote accepted

See comments

// I'll pretend you have a #include <stdio.h> here

class A
{
 virtual void func1()
 {
  print 0; // error!!  I'll pretend this was puts("0");
 }

 virtual void func2()
 {
  print1;  // error!!  I'll pretend this was puts("1"); 
 }
};

// there is a virtual table for class A. (for two virtual methods)


 class B:Public A
 {
  void func1()
  {
   print2; // error!!  I'll pretend this was puts("2"); 
  }
 };

// there is a virtual table for class B. (for two virtual methods)


class C:public B
{
 virtual void func2()
 {
  print 3; // error!!  I'll pretend this was puts("3"); 
 }
}

// there is a virtual table for class C. (for two virtual methods)


int main()
{
A objA;
B* objB = new B();

C* objC = new C();

//case1:
objA = &objB;   // error!! left side of type A right side of type B**
objA->func1();  // error!!  operator -> on non pointer

//case2:
objA = &objC;  // error!! left side of type A right side of type B**
objA->func2(); // error!!  operator -> on non pointer
objA->func1(); // error!!  operator -> on non pointer
return 0;
}

// nothing is printed

Since you edited the OP code, here it is the answer for the new version of your code. See comments:

#include <iostream> 
using namespace std;
class A
{
 virtual void func1()
 {
  cout << "0 " <<endl; // it's ok, but is the space supposed to be there?
 }

 virtual void func2()
 {
  cout << "1 " <<endl; // it's ok, but is the space supposed to be there?
 }
};
// there is a virtual table for class A. (for two virtual methods)

 class B:Public A  // error!! I'll pretend Public was public (lowercase)
 {
  void func1()
  {
   cout << "2" <<endl; // it's ok, but here there's no space, is that correct?
  }
 };
// there is a virtual table for class B. (for two virtual methods)

class C:public B
{
 virtual void func2()
 {
  cout << "3" <<endl; // it's ok, but here there's no space, is that correct?
 }
}
// there is a virtual table for class C. (for two virtual methods)

int main()
{
A* objA;

B objB ;
C objC ;

//case1:
objA = &objB;
objA->func1(); // outputs (to stdout) a '2' (two) and whatever a 
               // newline is on your system (could be '\r' or '\n' or both
               // or in fact anything your platform defines a newline is)
               // stdout is then flushed.
//case2:
objA = &objC;
objA->func2(); // outputs (to stdout) a '3' (three) and whatever a 
               // newline is on your system (could be '\r' or '\n' or both
               // or in fact anything your platform defines a newline is)
               // stdout is then flushed.

objA->func1(); // outputs (to stdout) a '2' (two) and whatever a 
               // newline is on your system (could be '\r' or '\n' or both
               // or in fact anything your platform defines a newline is)
               // stdout is then flushed.
return 0;
}
// the output is '2' <newline> '3' <newline> '2' <newline> 
// where the actual character(s) for <newline> are platform dependent  
share|improve this answer
    
check the code now – user1687824 Sep 21 '12 at 8:01
    
its considerably closer to compiling now, anyway, but if you were to actually compile it you may find that "Public" and "public" are not synonyms. – WhozCraig Sep 21 '12 at 8:11
    
added response to edited OP code – Analog File Sep 21 '12 at 10:40
    
Thank you. It helped me a lot – user1687824 Sep 27 '12 at 6:26

Instances of class B are instances of type A as well. Your class B calls the constructor for class A and if B does not override func1() from A then B has a virtual func2() and an override for func1() from A.

share|improve this answer

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