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I use RScript in Windows and by default it saves the plots into the pdf file Rplots.pdf, one plot per page.

I would like to get each plot saved into an image file like a .png, is it possible?

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Look at ?png. –  Roland Sep 21 '12 at 7:38
    
@Roland Thank you, I just added png() at the beginning of the script to solve the problem. –  uvts_cvs Sep 21 '12 at 7:48
    
I would really appreciate comments from the downvoters in order to improve the question. –  uvts_cvs Sep 21 '12 at 7:50
    
Your question is quite basic and short, with no reproducible example code. That might be the reason. –  Paul Hiemstra Sep 21 '12 at 7:53
1  
I downvoted because you made zero effort to do any work at your end. ??function_name will search base packages and your libraries for any function containing that word. A quick google search would have gotten you an answer. –  Maiasaura Sep 21 '12 at 20:59
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To save your plots as a png file, the general idea is:

png("spam.png")
plot(...)
dev.off()

similar functions are jpeg and tiff. Wrap all your plots in such calls to png to save the plots to specific names. Adding png() at the top of the script will save all plots in different png files: Rplot001.png, Rplot002.png. I would however try and give meaningful names to the plots.

Using Cairo devices, you can use savePlot. When you plot with ggplot2, the best way imo to save a plot is using ggsave.

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Thank you. png("spam.png") will save just the last plot. –  uvts_cvs Sep 21 '12 at 8:01
    
Actually, it probably overwrites the plots each time, ending up with only the last one. –  Paul Hiemstra Sep 21 '12 at 8:03
    
@uvts_cvs - see the bottom of the help page of ?png for an example of how to build in an iterator into the file name so things don't overwrite themsevles...alternatively - do it directly via a for loop or an apply function...this is where having some of your code would have been handy :) –  Chase Sep 21 '12 at 12:57
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