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Consider the following program:

program IntegerOverloads;
{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

procedure WordOrCardinal(Value: Word); overload;
begin
  Writeln('Word');
end;

procedure WordOrCardinal(Value: Cardinal); overload;
begin
  Writeln('Cardinal');
end;

procedure SmallintOrInteger(Value: Smallint); overload;
begin
  Writeln('Smallint');
end;

procedure SmallintOrInteger(Value: Integer); overload;
begin
  Writeln('Integer');
end;

procedure ShortintOrSmallint(Value: Shortint); overload;
begin
  Writeln('Shortint');
end;

procedure ShortintOrSmallint(Value: Smallint); overload;
begin
  Writeln('Smallint');
end;

procedure Main;
var
  _integer: Integer;
  _cardinal: Cardinal;
  _word: Word;
begin
  WordOrCardinal(_Integer);
  SmallintOrInteger(_cardinal);
  ShortintOrSmallint(_word);
end;

begin
  Main;
  Readln;
end.

The output when compiled by XE2 is:

Cardinal
Integer
Smallint

The output when compiled by Delphi 6 is:

Word
Smallint
Shortint

The documentation states (emphasis mine):

You can pass to an overloaded routine parameters that are not identical in type with those in any of the routine's declarations, but that are assignment-compatible with the parameters in more than one declaration. This happens most frequently when a routine is overloaded with different integer types or different real types - for example:

procedure Store(X: Longint); overload;
procedure Store(X: Shortint); overload;

In these cases, when it is possible to do so without ambiguity, the compiler invokes the routine whose parameters are of the type with the smallest range that accommodates the actual parameters in the call.

But that does seem to apply here. None of the procedure calls in the example code accept a type that accommodates the actual parameters in the call.

I cannot find any documentation that describes what rule the compiler follows. Can anyone point me to such documentation?

This question was prompted by the following articles:


Update

Prompted by Ken White's comments, I wrote another program to illustrate some more oddities:

program IntegerOverloadsPart2;
{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

procedure Test(Value: Byte); overload;
begin
  Writeln('Byte');
end;

procedure Test(Value: Word); overload;
begin
  Writeln('Word');
end;

procedure Test(Value: Cardinal); overload;
begin
  Writeln('Cardinal');
end;

procedure Test(Value: Uint64); overload;
begin
  Writeln('Uint64');
end;

procedure Main;
var
  _byte: Byte;
  _shortint: Shortint;
  _word: Word;
  _smallint: Smallint;
  _cardinal: Cardinal;
  _integer: Integer;
  _uint64: UInt64;
  _int64: Int64;
begin
  Writeln('Unsigned variables passed as parameters:');
  Test(_byte);
  Test(_word);
  Test(_cardinal);
  Test(_uint64);
  Writeln;
  Writeln('Signed variables passed as parameters:');
  Test(_shortint);
  Test(_smallint);
  Test(_integer);
  Test(_int64);
end;

begin
  Main;
  Readln;
end.

When compiled by XE2 the output is:

Unsigned variables passed as parameters:
Byte
Word
Cardinal
Uint64

Signed variables passed as parameters:
Uint64
Uint64
Uint64
Uint64

On Delphi 6 I have to remove the UInt64 overload since that type does not exist on Delphi 6 the output is:

Unsigned variables passed as parameters:
Byte
Word
Cardinal

Signed variables passed as parameters:
Byte
Byte
Byte

Again neither behaviour looks consistent with the statement that:

In these cases, when it is possible to do so without ambiguity, the compiler invokes the routine whose parameters are of the type with the smallest range that accommodates the actual parameters in the call.

share|improve this question
3  
How do you interpret "range"? If you see it as "Word and Smallint both have 65536 different values", then the XE2 output matches the documentation. If you see it as "Word has a range from 0 to 65535, Smallint has a range from -32768 to 32767", then as far as I can tell there is no correct answer based on the documentation you linked to. –  hvd Sep 21 '12 at 8:45
2  
@hvd My interpretation is the second one that you describe. –  David Heffernan Sep 21 '12 at 8:50
2  
+1. Nice question. I thought at first it had to do with different values assigned to each of the variables, but some experimentation with them shows that isn't the case. (Assigning a very small value to _word does not change it's size from SmallInt, and a very large value leaves it unchanged as well.) I wonder if this is related to changes made for 32/64 bit support? –  Ken White Sep 21 '12 at 12:55
1  
@ken "I thought at first it had to do with different values assigned to each of the variables" That raises an interesting topic. Data flow analysis. The Delphi compiler does none. So if you write i := 1; if i > 0 then the compiler will check the inequality at runtime. The compiler simply does not do data flow analysis. I think that's no bad thing. No criticism at all. –  David Heffernan Sep 21 '12 at 23:07
2  
Actually, the XE2 behavior makes sense; I think earlier versions were wrong. Calling WordOrCardinal with an Integer, which is 32-bit, should call the Cardinal version barring any compile-time information about the value, as a 32-bit Integer can't be presumed to fit into a 16-bit Word. The same applies to ShortintOrSmallInt(_word), where a 16-bit Word can't possibly be assumed to fit into an 8-bit ShortInt, so it resolves to SmallInt instead. It may result in a runtime range check or overflow exception, but at compile time there's no value to consider. Am I missing something? –  Ken White Sep 21 '12 at 23:41
show 14 more comments

1 Answer

Neither unsigned type can accommodate a signed type; the documentation quoted is consistent with your examples - it just says nothing about how the compiler will treat them. On the other hand a signed type can accommodate an unsigned type (SmallInt accomodates Byte, LongInt accomodates Word, Int64 accomodates Cardinal):

program IntegerOverloadsPart3;
{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

procedure Test(Value: ShortInt); overload;
begin
  Writeln('Short');
end;

procedure Test(Value: SmallInt); overload;
begin
  Writeln('Small');
end;

procedure Test(Value: LongInt); overload;
begin
  Writeln('Long');
end;

procedure Test(Value: Int64); overload;
begin
  Writeln('64');
end;

procedure Main;
var
  _byte: Byte;
  _word: Word;
  _cardinal: Cardinal;
  _uint64: UInt64;
begin
  Writeln('Unsigned variables passed as parameters:');
  Test(_byte);
  Test(_word);
  Test(_cardinal);
  Test(_uint64);
  Writeln;
end;

begin
  Main;
  Readln;
end.

Delphi XE output:

Small
Long
64
64
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it all makes sense that way round, passing unsigned variables to procedures which take signed parameters. It's the other way around that is troublesome. –  David Heffernan Sep 22 '12 at 19:36
    
@DavidHeffernan - if you are writing overloads why not to write some more (for signed types) to remove all ambiguities? –  user246408 Sep 22 '12 at 19:46
1  
I'm not writing code like this. I consider it to be a minefield. Jolyon's blog articles got me thinking and I'd like to understand why the compiler behaves as it does. –  David Heffernan Sep 22 '12 at 19:50
2  
yes it is a minefield, and it will remain a minefield even if a compiler engineer will explain why the compiler behaves so. –  user246408 Sep 22 '12 at 20:06
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