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Is it possible to chain static methods together using a static class? Say I wanted to do something like this:

$value = TestClass::toValue(5)::add(3)::subtract(2)::add(8)::result();

. . . and obviously I would want $value to be assigned the number 14. Is this possible?

Update: It doesn't work (you can't return "self" - it's not an instance!), but this is where my thoughts have taken me:

class TestClass {
    public static $currentValue;

    public static function toValue($value) {
    	self::$currentValue = $value;
    }

    public static function add($value) {
    	self::$currentValue = self::$currentValue + $value;
    	return self;
    }

    public static function subtract($value) {
    	self::$currentValue = self::$currentValue - $value;
    	return self;
    }

    public static function result() {
    	return self::$value;
    }
}

After working that out, I think it would just make more sense to simply work with a class instance rather than trying to chain static function calls (which doesn't look possible, unless the above example could be tweaked somehow).

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8 Answers 8

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I like the solution provided by Camilo above, essentially since all you're doing is altering the value of a static member, and since you do want chaining (even though it's only syntatic sugar), then instantiating TestClass is probably the best way to go.

I'd suggest a Singleton pattern if you want to restrict instantiation of the class:

class TestClass
{   
    public static $currentValue;

    private static $_instance = null;

    private function __construct () { }

    public static function getInstance ()
    {
        if (self::$_instance === null) {
            self::$_instance = new self;
        }

        return self::$_instance;
    }

    public function toValue($value) {
        self::$currentValue = $value;
        return $this;
    }

    public function add($value) {
        self::$currentValue = self::$currentValue + $value;
        return $this;
    }

    public function subtract($value) {
        self::$currentValue = self::$currentValue - $value;
        return $this;
    }

    public function result() {
        return self::$currentValue;
    }
}

// Example Usage:
$result = TestClass::getInstance ()
    ->toValue(5)
    ->add(3)
    ->subtract(2)
    ->add(8)
    ->result();
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Just finished implementing this method and it works perfectly! –  Wilco Sep 29 '08 at 15:39
    
public function result() { return $this::$value; } is this line meant to be public function result() { return $this::$currentValue; } ???? –  Val Jan 14 '10 at 14:16
    
Thanks, updated. –  Mathew Byrne Jan 18 '10 at 4:05
    
This won't work as soon as you want to use more than one together. $a = TestClass::getInstance()->toValue(3)->add(5); $b = TestClass::getInstance()->toValue(7)->add($a->result()); echo $b->result(); You'll get 14 instead of 15. Don't handle money with that math. –  Glenn Moss Jun 13 '11 at 22:56
2  
The constructor definition private __construct () { } should be private function __construct () { }. Also, return $this::$currentValue; should be return self::$currentValue;. –  Glenn Moss Jun 13 '11 at 22:59
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Little crazy code on php5.3... just for fun.

namespace chaining;
class chain
    {
    static public function one()
        {return get_called_class();}

    static public function two()
        {return get_called_class();}
    }

${${${${chain::one()} = chain::two()}::one()}::two()}::one();
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7  
Holy crap! My eyes bleed! :D –  Mészáros Lajos Nov 27 '13 at 15:09
2  
This maybe is the best piece of PHP I have ever seen. –  kaiser Jun 17 at 0:17
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If toValue(x) returns an object, you could do like this:

$value = TestClass::toValue(5)->add(3)->substract(2)->add(8);

Providing that toValue returns a new instance of the object, and each next method mutates it, returning an instance of $this.

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These are not static though. –  472084 Apr 30 at 11:08
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class oop{
public static $val;

public static function add($var){
    static::$val+=$var;
    return new static;
}

public static function sub($var){
    static::$val-=$var;
    return new static;
}

public static function out(){
    return static::$val;
}

public static function init($var){
    static::$val=$var;
    return new static;      
}

}

echo oop::init(5)->add(2)->out();
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You could always use the First method as a static and the remaining as instance methods:

$value = Math::toValue(5)->add(3)->subtract(2)->add(8)->result();

Or better yet:

 $value = Math::eval(Math::value(5)->add(3)->subtract(2)->add(8));

class Math {
     public $operation;
     public $operationValue;
     public $args;
     public $allOperations = array();

     public function __construct($aOperation, $aValue, $theArgs)
     {
       $this->operation = $aOperation;
       $this->operationValue = $aValue;
       $this->args = $theArgs;
     }

     public static function eval($math) {
       if(strcasecmp(get_class($math), "Math") == 0){
            $newValue = $math->operationValue;
            foreach ($math->allOperations as $operationKey=>$currentOperation) {
                switch($currentOperation->operation){
                    case "add":
                         $newvalue = $currentOperation->operationValue + $currentOperation->args;
                         break;
                    case "subtract":
                         $newvalue = $currentOperation->operationValue - $currentOperation->args;
                         break;
                }
            }
            return $newValue;
       }
       return null;
     }

     public function add($number){
         $math = new Math("add", null, $number);
         $this->allOperations[count($this->allOperations)] &= $math;
         return $this;
     }

     public function subtract($number){
         $math = new Math("subtract", null, $number);
         $this->allOperations[count($this->allOperations)] &= $math;
         return $this;
     }

     public static function value($number){
         return new Math("value", $number, null);
     }
 }

Just an FYI.. I wrote this off the top of my head (right here on the site). So, it may not run, but that is the idea. I could have also did a recursive method call to eval, but I thought this may be simpler. Please let me know if you would like me to elaborate or provide any other help.

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In a nutshell... no. :) The resolution operator (::) would work for the TetsClass::toValue(5) part, but everything after that will just give a syntax error.

Once namespaces are implemented in 5.3, you can have "chained" :: operators, but all that'll do is drill down through the namespace tree; it won't be possible to have methods in the middle of things like this.

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No, this won't work. The :: operator needs to evaluate back to a class, so after the TestClass::toValue(5) evaluates, the ::add(3) method would only be able to evaluate on the answer of the last one. So if toValue(5) returned the integer 5, you would basically be calling int(5)::add(3) which obviously is an error.

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The best that can be done

class S
{
    public static function  __callStatic($name,$args)
    {
        echo 'called S::'.$name . '( )<p>';
        return '_t';
    }
}

$_t='S';
${${S::X()}::F()}::C();
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