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I want a version of str_replace() that only replaces the first occurrence of $search in the $subject. Is there an easy solution to this, or do I need a hacky solution?

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17 Answers 17

up vote 115 down vote accepted

Can be done with preg_replace:

<?
$str = 'abcdef abcdef abcdef';
// pattern, replacement, string, limit
echo preg_replace('/abc/', '123', $str, 1); // outputs '123def abcdef abcdef'
?>

The magic is in the optional fourth parameter [Limit]. From the documentation:

[Limit] - The maximum possible replacements for each pattern in each subject string. Defaults to -1 (no limit).

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20  
The downside to this method is the performance penalty of regular expressions. –  zombat Aug 10 '09 at 2:42
17  
Another downside is you have to use preg_quote() on the "needle" and escape meta-characters $ and \ in the replacement. –  Josh Davis Aug 10 '09 at 2:53
21  
This fails as a generic solution due to nasty escaping issues. –  jeremy Jul 9 '11 at 0:39

There's no version of it, but the solution isn't hacky at all.

$pos = strpos($haystack,$needle);
if ($pos !== false) {
    $newstring = substr_replace($haystack,$replace,$pos,strlen($needle));
}

Pretty easy, and saves the performance penalty of regular expressions.

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7  
Can be much faster and will use less memory than regular expressions. No idea why someone would vote that down... –  Josh Davis Aug 10 '09 at 2:54
6  
Yeah, someone came through and voted a bunch of the answers down. Always a classy move. –  zombat Aug 10 '09 at 3:49
9  
I like this approach, but the code has an error, the last parameter of substr_replace call should be strlen($needle) instead of strlen($replace).. please beware about that!! –  Nelson Sep 21 '10 at 11:47
    
It is "hacky" in the sense that it takes considerably more time to figure out what's going on. Also if it was clear code, it wouldn't have been mentioned that the code has an error. If it's possible to make a mistake in such a small snippet, it's way too hacky already. –  Camilo Martin Nov 12 '13 at 18:01
2  
I disagree with @CamiloMartin with regards to the number of lines vs. the possibility of mistakes. While substr_replace is a somewhat unwieldy function to use owing to all the parameters, the real issue is that doing string manipulation by numbers is just tricky sometimes - you have to be careful to pass the right variable/offset to functions. I'd actually go so far as to say that the above code is the most straightforward, and to me, logical, approach. –  Alex Apr 22 at 15:21

Edit: both answers have been updated and are now correct. I'll leave the answer since the function timings are still useful.

The answers by 'zombat' and 'too much php' are unfortunately not correct. This is a revision to the answer zombat posted (as I don't have enough reputation to post a comment):

$pos = strpos($haystack,$needle);
if ($pos !== false) {
    $newstring = substr_replace($haystack,$replace,$pos,strlen($needle));
}

Note the strlen($needle), instead of strlen($replace). Zombat's example will only work correctly if needle and replace are the same length.

Here's the same functionality in a function with the same signature as PHP's own str_replace:

function str_replace_first($search, $replace, $subject) {
    $pos = strpos($subject, $search);
    if ($pos !== false) {
        $subject = substr_replace($subject, $replace, $pos, strlen($search));
    }
    return $subject;
}

This is the revised answer of 'too much php':

implode($replace, explode($search, $subject, 2));

Note the 2 at the end instead of 1. Or in function format:

function str_replace_first($search, $replace, $subject) {
    return implode($replace, explode($search, $subject, 2));
}

I timed the two functions and the first one is twice as fast when no match is found. They are the same speed when a match is found.

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3  
+1 for the ninja implode / explode move. –  Bainternet Oct 3 '13 at 10:00
    
Why not genericize this like: str_replace_flexible(mixed $s, mixed $r, int $offset, int $limit) where the function replaces $limit occurrences starting at the $offset (nth) match. –  Adam Friedman May 23 at 19:09

Unfortunately, I don't know of any PHP funciton which can do this. You can roll your own fairly easily like this:

function replace_first($find, $replace, $subject) {
    // stolen from the comments at PHP.net/str_replace
    // Splits $subject into an array of 2 items by $find,
    // and then joins the array with $replace
    return implode($replace, explode($find, $subject, 2));
}
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WONDERED WHICH ONE WAS THE FASTEST...SO I TESTED THEM ALL

BELOW YOU WILL FIND

  • A COMPREHENSIVE LIST OF ALL FUNCTIONS THAT HAVE BEEN CONTRIBUTED ON THIS PAGE
  • BENCHMARK TESTING FOR EACH CONTRIBUTION (average execution time over 10,000 runs)
  • LINKS TO EACH ANSWER (for the full code)

All Functions were tested with the same settings

$string = 'OOO.OOO.OOO.S';
$search = 'OOO'; 
$replace = 'B';

Functions that were to replace ONLY FIRST occurrence of a string within a string


Functions that replace ONLY the LAST occurrence of a string within a string

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I created this little function that replaces string on string with limit, without the need of Regexp. It works fine.

function str_replace_limit($search, $replace, $string, $limit = 1) {
  if (is_bool($pos = (strpos($string, $search))))
    return $string;

  $search_len = strlen($search);

  for ($i = 0; $i < $limit; $i++) {
    $string = substr_replace($string, $replace, $pos, $search_len);

    if (is_bool($pos = (strpos($string, $search))))
      break;
  }
  return $string;
}
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To expand on @renocor's answer, I've written a function that is 100% backward-compatible with str_replace(). That is, you can replace all occurrences of str_replace() with str_replace_limit() without messing anything up, even those using arrays for the $search, $replace, and/or $subject.

The function could be completely self-contained, if you wanted to replace the function call with ($string===strval(intval(strval($string)))), but I'd recommend against it since valid_integer() is a rather useful function when dealing with integers provided as strings.

Note: Whenever possible, str_replace_limit() will use str_replace() instead, so all calls to str_replace() can be replaced with str_replace_limit() without worrying about a hit to performance.

Usage

<?php
$search = 'a';
$replace = 'b';
$subject = 'abcabc';
$limit = -1; // No limit
$new_string = str_replace_limit($search, $replace, $subject, $count, $limit);
echo $count.' replacements -- '.$new_string;

2 replacements -- bbcbbc

$limit = 1; // Limit of 1
$new_string = str_replace_limit($search, $replace, $subject, $count, $limit);
echo $count.' replacements -- '.$new_string;

1 replacements -- bbcabc

$limit = 10; // Limit of 10
$new_string = str_replace_limit($search, $replace, $subject, $count, $limit);
echo $count.' replacements -- '.$new_string;

2 replacements -- bbcbbc

Function

<?php

/**
 * Checks if $string is a valid integer. Integers provided as strings (e.g. '2' vs 2)
 * are also supported.
 * @param mixed $string
 * @return bool Returns boolean TRUE if string is a valid integer, or FALSE if it is not 
 */
function valid_integer($string){
    // 1. Cast as string (in case integer is provided)
    // 1. Convert the string to an integer and back to a string
    // 2. Check if identical (note: 'identical', NOT just 'equal')
    // Note: TRUE, FALSE, and NULL $string values all return FALSE
    $string = strval($string);
    return ($string===strval(intval($string)));
}

/**
 * Replace $limit occurences of the search string with the replacement string
 * @param mixed $search The value being searched for, otherwise known as the needle. An
 * array may be used to designate multiple needles.
 * @param mixed $replace The replacement value that replaces found search values. An
 * array may be used to designate multiple replacements.
 * @param mixed $subject The string or array being searched and replaced on, otherwise
 * known as the haystack. If subject is an array, then the search and replace is
 * performed with every entry of subject, and the return value is an array as well. 
 * @param string $count If passed, this will be set to the number of replacements
 * performed.
 * @param int $limit The maximum possible replacements for each pattern in each subject
 * string. Defaults to -1 (no limit).
 * @return string This function returns a string with the replaced values.
 */
function str_replace_limit(
        $search,
        $replace,
        $subject,
        &$count,
        $limit = -1
    ){

    // Set some defaults
    $count = 0;

    // Invalid $limit provided. Throw a warning.
    if(!valid_integer($limit)){
        $backtrace = debug_backtrace();
        trigger_error('Invalid $limit `'.$limit.'` provided to '.__function__.'() in '.
                '`'.$backtrace[0]['file'].'` on line '.$backtrace[0]['line'].'. Expecting an '.
                'integer', E_USER_WARNING);
        return $subject;
    }

    // Invalid $limit provided. Throw a warning.
    if($limit<-1){
        $backtrace = debug_backtrace();
        trigger_error('Invalid $limit `'.$limit.'` provided to '.__function__.'() in '.
                '`'.$backtrace[0]['file'].'` on line '.$backtrace[0]['line'].'. Expecting -1 or '.
                'a positive integer', E_USER_WARNING);
        return $subject;
    }

    // No replacements necessary. Throw a notice as this was most likely not the intended
    // use. And, if it was (e.g. part of a loop, setting $limit dynamically), it can be
    // worked around by simply checking to see if $limit===0, and if it does, skip the
    // function call (and set $count to 0, if applicable).
    if($limit===0){
        $backtrace = debug_backtrace();
        trigger_error('Invalid $limit `'.$limit.'` provided to '.__function__.'() in '.
                '`'.$backtrace[0]['file'].'` on line '.$backtrace[0]['line'].'. Expecting -1 or '.
                'a positive integer', E_USER_NOTICE);
        return $subject;
    }

    // Use str_replace() whenever possible (for performance reasons)
    if($limit===-1){
        return str_replace($search, $replace, $subject, $count);
    }

    if(is_array($subject)){

        // Loop through $subject values and call this function for each one.
        foreach($subject as $key => $this_subject){

            // Skip values that are arrays (to match str_replace()).
            if(!is_array($this_subject)){

                // Call this function again for
                $this_function = __FUNCTION__;
                $subject[$key] = $this_function(
                        $search,
                        $replace,
                        $this_subject,
                        $this_count,
                        $limit
                );

                // Adjust $count
                $count += $this_count;

                // Adjust $limit, if not -1
                if($limit!=-1){
                    $limit -= $this_count;
                }

                // Reached $limit, return $subject
                if($limit===0){
                    return $subject;
                }

            }

        }

        return $subject;

    } elseif(is_array($search)){
        // Only treat $replace as an array if $search is also an array (to match str_replace())

        // Clear keys of $search (to match str_replace()).
        $search = array_values($search);

        // Clear keys of $replace, if applicable (to match str_replace()).
        if(is_array($replace)){
            $replace = array_values($replace);
        }

        // Loop through $search array.
        foreach($search as $key => $this_search){

            // Don't support multi-dimensional arrays (to match str_replace()).
            $this_search = strval($this_search);

            // If $replace is an array, use the value of $replace[$key] as the replacement. If
            // $replace[$key] doesn't exist, just an empty string (to match str_replace()).
            if(is_array($replace)){
                if(array_key_exists($key, $replace)){
                    $this_replace = strval($replace[$key]);
                } else {
                    $this_replace = '';
                }
            } else {
                $this_replace = strval($replace);
            }

            // Call this function again for
            $this_function = __FUNCTION__;
            $subject = $this_function(
                    $this_search,
                    $this_replace,
                    $subject,
                    $this_count,
                    $limit
            );

            // Adjust $count
            $count += $this_count;

            // Adjust $limit, if not -1
            if($limit!=-1){
                $limit -= $this_count;
            }

            // Reached $limit, return $subject
            if($limit===0){
                return $subject;
            }

        }

        return $subject;

    } else {
        $search = strval($search);
        $replace = strval($replace);

        // Get position of first $search
        $pos = strpos($subject, $search);

        // Return $subject if $search cannot be found
        if($pos===false){
            return $subject;
        }

        // Get length of $search, to make proper replacement later on
        $search_len = strlen($search);

        // Loop until $search can no longer be found, or $limit is reached
        for($i=0;(($i<$limit)||($limit===-1));$i++){

            // Replace 
            $subject = substr_replace($subject, $replace, $pos, $search_len);

            // Increase $count
            $count++;

            // Get location of next $search
            $pos = strpos($subject, $search);

            // Break out of loop if $needle
            if($pos===false){
                break;
            }

        }

        // Return new $subject
        return $subject;

    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
kinda bloated if you ask me. Also what I the most 'hate' at this solution is the error handling. It breaks the script if you pass incorrect values. You think it is looking professional but it is not, instead of an error produce a notice or warning instead. Better is to skip the bullshit, return false instead or null and never use a backtrace in function like this. The best solution is that the programmer can decide what to do when the output is wrong/ unexpected. –  Erwinus Jul 16 '13 at 20:40
    
@Erwinus This uses E_USER_WARNING throughout, which is a warning, not an error. The backtrace is extremely useful to find out what code is passing the invalid data to the function in the first place (which is absolutely necessary to track down bugs in production). As for returning $subject instead of false/null or throwing an error, that was simply a personal choice for my use case. To match str_replace()'s functionality, using catchable fatal errors would be the best bet (as str_replace() does when providing a closure for the first two arguments). –  bfrohs Jul 17 '13 at 3:03
    
Ah, didn't notice about the E_USER_WARNING your are using, sorry for that. The problem with returning the subject is that you can never see there was something wrong, outside the function. That said, the function can be half the size if you do it smarter (it is possible). Second, comments are fine when it explains something complex but not very useful for simple things like increase a value. Overall I think it is unnecessary huge. Also, using warnings in a production environment can be security issue when you use this code on a server that does not suppress run-time messages by default (logs). –  Erwinus Jul 17 '13 at 3:47
    
@Erwinus I was verbose when it came to the comments because some people don't understand the language as well as others, and comments can always be removed by those that do understand it. If you know of a better way of getting the same end result for all edge cases, by all means, edit the answer. And if your production environment doesn't suppress error messages, you've got a bigger issue than this function ;) –  bfrohs Jul 17 '13 at 3:58

In PHP you can iterate over the letters of a string or access the letters as it is possible to access elements of an array.

The snippet which replces only first letter of the string:

$word[0] = str_replace($find, $replace, $word[0]);

You can also access each letter using curly brackets. I use following code for replacing lowercase polish accented chars to uppercase one.

$word{0} = str_replace(
    array('ą', 'ż', 'ś', 'ź', 'ę', 'ć', 'ł', 'ó', 'ń'), 
    array('Ą', 'Ż', 'Ś', 'Ź', 'Ę', 'Ć', 'Ł', 'Ó', 'Ń'), $word{0}
);
share|improve this answer
1  
The question is about finding the first occurrence of any string not just the first letter. –  Benjamin Paap Dec 8 '12 at 19:22

According to my test result, I'd like to vote the regular_express one provided by karim79. (I don't have enough reputation to vote it now!)

The solution from zombat uses too many function calls, I even simplify the codes. I'm using PHP 5.4 to run both solutions for 100,000 times, and here's the result:

$str = 'Hello abc, have a nice day abc! abc!';
$pos = strpos($str, 'abc');
$str = substr_replace($str, '123', $pos, 3);

==> 1.85 sec

$str = 'Hello abc, have a nice day abc! abc!';
$str = preg_replace('/abc/', '123', $str, 1);

==> 1.35 sec

As you can see. The performance of preg_replace is not so bad as many people think. So I'd suggest the classy solution if your regular express is not complicated.

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To expand on zombat's answer (which I believe to be the best answer), I created a recursive version of his function that takes in a $limit parameter to specify how many occurrences you want to replace.

function str_replace_limit($haystack, $needle, $replace, $limit, $start_pos = 0) {
    if ($limit <= 0) {
        return $haystack;
    } else {
        $pos = strpos($haystack,$needle,$start_pos);
        if ($pos !== false) {
            $newstring = substr_replace($haystack, $replace, $pos, strlen($needle));
            return str_replace_limit($newstring, $needle, $replace, $limit-1, $pos+strlen($replace));
        } else {
            return $haystack;
        }
    }
}
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The easiest way would be to use regular expression.

The other way is to find the position of the string with strpos() and then an substr_replace()

But i would really go for the RegExp.

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$string = 'this is my world, not my world';
$find = 'world';
$replace = 'farm';
$result = preg_replace("/$find/",$replace,$string,1);
echo $result;
share|improve this answer
    
This is just the same as the first answer. Besides, you should do a preg_quote of $find before using it as an expression. –  Emil Vikström Jun 21 '12 at 22:37

For a string

$string = 'OOO.OOO.OOO.S';
$search = 'OOO';
$replace = 'B';

//replace ONLY FIRST occurance of "OOO" with "B"
    $string = substr_replace($string,$replace,0,strlen($search));
    //$string => B.OOO.OOO.S

//replace ONLY LAST occurance of "OOOO" with "B"
    $string = substr_replace($string,$replace,strrpos($string,$search),strlen($search)) 
    //$string => OOO.OOO.B.S

    //replace ONLY LAST occurance of "OOOO" with "B"
    $string = strrev(implode(strrev($replace),explode(strrev($search),strrev($string),2)))
    //$string => OOO.OOO.B.S

For a single character

$string[strpos($string,$search)] = $replace;


//EXAMPLE

$string = 'O.O.O.O.S';
$search = 'O';
$replace = 'B';

//replace ONLY FIRST occurance of "O" with "B" 
    $string[strpos($string,$search)] = $replace;  
    //$string => B.O.O.O.S

//replace ONLY LAST occurance of "O" with "B" 
    $string[strrpos($string,$search)] = $replace; 
    // $string => B.O.O.B.S
share|improve this answer

Here's a simple class I created to wrap our slightly modified str_replace() functions.

Our php::str_rreplace() function also allows you to carry out a reverse, limited str_replace() which can be very handy when trying to replace only the final X instance(s) of a string.

These examples both use preg_replace().

<?php
class php {

    /**
    * str_replace() from the end of a string that can also be limited e.g. replace only the last instance of '</div>' with ''
    *
    * @param string   $find
    * @param string   $replace
    * @param string   $subject
    * @param int      $replacement_limit | -1 to replace all references
    *
    * @return string
    */
    public static function str_replace($find, $replace, $subject, $replacement_limit = -1) {
        $find_pattern = str_replace('/', '\/', $find);
        return preg_replace('/' . $find_pattern . '/', $replace, $subject, $replacement_limit);
    }

    /**
    * str_replace() from the end of a string that can also be limited e.g. replace only the last instance of '</div>' with ''
    *
    * @param string   $find
    * @param string   $replace
    * @param string   $subject
    * @param int      $replacement_limit | -1 to replace all references
    *
    * @return string
    */
    public static function str_rreplace($find, $replace, $subject, $replacement_limit = -1) {
        return strrev( self::str_replace(strrev($find), strrev($replace), strrev($subject), $replacement_limit) );
    }
}
share|improve this answer

this is my first answer here, I hope to do it correctly. Why not use the fourth argument of the str_replace function for this problem?

mixed str_replace ( mixed $search , mixed $replace , mixed $subject [, int &$count ] )

count: If passed, this will be set to the number of replacements performed.

share|improve this answer
    
The fourth arguments will be set by str_replace() to the number of replacements that were made. That is why you get an error when you pass an integer and not a variable to it. –  arminrosu Jan 8 at 16:50

You can use this:

function str_replace_once($str_pattern, $str_replacement, $string){ 

        if (strpos($string, $str_pattern) !== false){ 
            $occurrence = strpos($string, $str_pattern); 
            return substr_replace($string, $str_replacement, strpos($string, $str_pattern), strlen($str_pattern)); 
        } 

        return $string; 
    } 

Found this example from php.net

Usage:

$string = "Thiz iz an examplz";
var_dump(str_replace_once('z','Z', $string)); 

Output:

ThiZ iz an examplz

This may reduce the performance a little bit, but the easiest solution.

share|improve this answer
    
If that is the output than what is the point? Shouldn't it only replace the first lowercase "z" with an uppercase "Z"? Instead of replacing all of them? I thought that was what we were talking about here... –  Swivelgames Mar 11 at 6:08
    
My bad, it will only replace the first occurrence. Edited. –  happyhardik Apr 16 at 10:39

Its easy to find a solution to replace only the first or first couple of instances (by giving the count value). There are not many solutions to replace the last or last couple of instance.

Maybe something like str_replace($find, $replace, $subject, -3) should replace last three instances.

Anyways just a suggestion.

share|improve this answer
3  
Why answer a question with a suggestion when an answer has been accepted two years before?! –  mbinette Oct 28 '12 at 22:05

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