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I'm a bit confused about groovys method overloading behavior: Given the class and tests below, I am pretty okay with testAStringNull and testBStringNull throwing ambiguous method call exceptions, but why is that not the case for testANull and testBNull then?

And, much more importantly: why does testBNull(null) call String foo(A arg)? I guess the object doesn't know about the type of the variable it's bound to, but why is that call not ambiguous to groovy while the others are?

(I hope I explained well enough, my head hurts from generating this minimal example.)

class Foo {
    static class A {}
    static class B {}

    String foo(A arg) { return 'a' }

    String foo(String s, A a) { return 'a' }

    String foo(B arg) { return 'b' }

    String foo(String s, B b) { return 'b' }
}

Tests:

import org.junit.Test
import Foo.A
import Foo.B

class FooTest {
    Foo foo = new Foo()

    @Test
    void testA() {
        A a = new A()
        assert foo.foo(a) == 'a'
    }

    @Test
    void testAString() {
        A a = new A()
        assert foo.foo('foo', a) == 'a'
    }

    @Test()
    void testANull() {
        A a = null
        assert foo.foo(a) == 'a'
    }

    @Test
    void testAStringNull() {
        A a = null
        assert foo.foo('foo', a) == 'a'
    }

    @Test
    void testB() {
        B b = new B()
        assert foo.foo(b) == 'b'
    }

    @Test
    void testBString() {
        B b = new B()
        assert foo.foo('foo', b) == 'b'
    }

    @Test
    void testBNull() {
        B b = null
        assert foo.foo(b) == 'b'
    }

    @Test
    void testBStringNull() {
        B b = null
        assert foo.foo('foo', b) == 'b'
    }

}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

It's a (somewhat little-known) oddity of Groovy's multi-dispatch mechanism, which as attempting to invoke the "most appropriate" method, in combination with the fact that the provided static type (in your case A or B) is not used as part of the dispatch mechanism. When you declare A a = null, what you get is not a null reference of type A, but a reference to NullObject.

Ultimately, to safely handle possibly null parameters to overloaded methods, the caller must cast the argument, as in

A a = null
assert foo.foo('foo', a as A) == 'a'

This discussion on "Groovy Isn't A Superset of Java" may shed some light on the issue.

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Good answer. Hey, isn't there a stuff regarding a "path from the nearest class" related to this? –  Will P Sep 21 '12 at 18:19

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