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I have plpgsql function:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test() RETURNS VOID AS
$$
DECLARE
    my_row my_table%ROWTYPE;
BEGIN
    SELECT * INTO my_row FROM my_table WHERE id='1';
    my_row.date := now();
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

I would like to know if it's possible to directly UPDATE my_row record.

The only way I've found to do it now is:

UPDATE my_table SET date=now() WHERE id='1';

Note this is only an example function, the real one is far more complex than this.

I'm using PostgreSQL 9.2.

UPDATE:

Sorry for the confusion, what I wanted to say is:

SELECT * INTO my_row FROM my_table INTO my_row WHERE id='1';
make_lots_of_complicated_modifications_to(my_row, other_complex_parameters);
UPDATE my_row;

I.e. Use my_row to persist information in the underlying table. I have lots of parameters to update.

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you select NOW() in the first place, instead of a vague * ? –  Frank Heikens Sep 21 '12 at 11:01
1  
Do you want to update the variable in your plpgsql function or the row in the underlying table? –  Erwin Brandstetter Sep 21 '12 at 11:23
    
I want to persist the variable into the table without having to rewrite a field-by-field query. –  Jeroni Sep 21 '12 at 14:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would like to know if it's possible to directly update "my_row" record.

It is.
You can update columns of a row or record type in plpgsql - just like you have it. It should be working, obviously?

This would update the underlying table, of course, not the variable!

UPDATE my_table SET date=now() WHERE id='1';

You are confusing two things here ...


Answer to clarification in comment

I don't think there is syntax in PostgreSQL that can UPDATE a whole row. You can UPDATE a column list, though. Consider this demo:

Note how I use thedate instead of date as column name, date is a reserved word in every SQL standard and a type name in PostgreSQL.

CREATE TEMP TABLE my_table (id serial, thedate date);
INSERT INTO my_table(thedate) VALUES (now());

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test_up()
  RETURNS void LANGUAGE plpgsql AS
$func$
DECLARE
    _r my_table;
BEGIN
   SELECT * INTO _r FROM my_table WHERE id = 1;
   _r.thedate := now()::date + 5 ;

   UPDATE my_table t
    -- explicit list of columns to be to updated
   SET   (id, thedate) = (_r.id, _r.thedate)
   WHERE  t.id = 1;
END
$func$;

SELECT test_up();
SELECT * FROM my_table;

However, you can INSERT a whole row easily. Just don't supply a column list for the table (which you normally should, but in this case it is perfectly ok, not to).

As an UPDATE is internally a DELETE followed by an INSERT anyway, and a function automatically encapsulates everything in a transaction, I don't see, why you couldn't use this instead:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION x.test_ delins()
  RETURNS void LANGUAGE plpgsql AS
$func$
DECLARE
    _r my_table;
BEGIN
   SELECT * INTO _r
   FROM my_table WHERE id = 1;
   _r.thedate := now()::date + 10;

   DELETE FROM my_table t WHERE t.id = 1;
   INSERT INTO my_table SELECT _r.*;
END
$func$;
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for the confusion, –  Jeroni Sep 21 '12 at 13:49
    
How could I persist the ROWTYPE variable directly? –  Jeroni Sep 21 '12 at 13:59
    
Do you want to UPDATE the whole row or just the one column? –  Erwin Brandstetter Sep 21 '12 at 14:06
    
The whole row, I'm changing lots of fields with complex calculations. It would be something like oracle's SET ROW. –  Jeroni Sep 21 '12 at 14:08
2  
Erwin... it seems like the problem with the delete/insert method would be issues with foreign keys. How would/could you over come those issues? –  David S Oct 17 '12 at 19:02

yes, its possible to update / append the row-type variable,

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION test() RETURNS VOID AS $$
DECLARE    
         my_row my_table%ROWTYPE;
BEGIN
         SELECT * INTO my_row FROM my_table WHERE id='1';
         my_row.date := now(); 
         raise notice  'date  : %; ',my_row.date;
END;
$$ LANGUAGE plpgsql;

here the raise notice will display the today's date only.

but this will not update the column date in my_table.

share|improve this answer
    
I know, the date was an example, I'm making lots of changes into my_row and I want an easy way to persist the information again without having to write an UPDATE my_table SET <lots of changes> WHERE id=my_row.id. I think Oracle has a SET ROW system to persist records with these structures. –  Jeroni Sep 21 '12 at 14:18

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