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I'm wondering if there's any performance faulting caused by using 'assert' when ASSERT_ACTIVE is set to 0 (assert_options(ASSERT_ACTIVE, 0);.

For example, if I have a huge project with lots of asserts in it, will it be any slower than if those asserts wouldn't be there? On most languages, there would not be any difference between these 2 cases, but I'm thinking this is because they're compiled, and not executed on the fly as PHP is.

In case there's no performance difference, is it possible to create functions similar to assert in PHP, such that when a flag/variable is unset, all calls to that function is completely ignored? (Such a function could be used to make development/debugging easier, but would not have any value on a launched website).

Thanks.

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1  
Have you tried benchmarking it? –  Waleed Khan Sep 21 '12 at 12:17
    
@WaleedKhan I did that just now, on a decent server it adds ~1 sec on 1000000 calls, on a decent server; I probably won't have that many asserts in the script, but was hoping they're ignored just as the comments –  alex-i Sep 21 '12 at 12:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The performance hit wouldn't really be significant...use it all you want.

To create a similar function which ignores calls when a flag is unset...see below.

define('ASSERT_ENABLED', true);

function assertEquals($a, $b)
{
    if( !defined('ASSERT_ENABLED') || !ASSERT_ENABLED ) { 
        return;
    }

    if($a !== $b) { 
        throw new \RuntimeException("Failed asserting that $a === $b");
    }
}
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Thanks. I was afraid that maybe this is how asserts work. Even if the performance hit is not that big, I don't feel very good with having code that affects performance and is not of any use (when released). –  alex-i Sep 21 '12 at 12:54
    
If it's a useful dev tool, then don't worry about the production performance hit: it's virtually nonexistent and it's also not that hard to write a script to comment out all of your calls to assert if it bothers you. –  Lusitanian Sep 21 '12 at 13:02

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