Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can I somehow have overloaded methods which differ only by generic type constraints?

This does not compile:

    void Foo<T>(T bar) where T : class
    {

    }

    void Foo<T>(T bar) where T : struct
    {

    }

Since these are "open" methods, the actual method should be closed/constructed/fully-defined when it's referenced elsewhere in code with a concretely-typed T, and then it would be clear which overload to call.

The obvious solution is not to overload them, but I'm wondering why this doesn't work in C#?

Additional question: If this is just a C# compiler constraint, does the IL allow such an overload?

share|improve this question
2  
This is a good question and one that hopefully gets answered by @EricLippert. –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 21 '12 at 11:52
1  
@Mike: Or Jon Skeet. –  Nikhil Agrawal Sep 21 '12 at 11:53
1  
@NikhilAgrawal: yes, I always love a Jon Skeet answer, but this is also really Eric's bread and butter and so it's always interesting to see his answers to people when they say "why doesn't C# allow this?" –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 21 '12 at 11:55
1  
@Mike: Definetely because Eric will give an insider view being principal developer on the C# compiler team. –  Nikhil Agrawal Sep 21 '12 at 11:56
    
@NikhilAgrawal: exactly! –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 21 '12 at 11:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Can I somehow have overloaded methods which differ only by generic type constraints?

No. It's not part of the method signature in terms of overloading, just like the return type isn't.

There are horrible ways of "pseudo-overloading" in some cases, but I wouldn't recommend going down that path.

For more information, you might want to read:

share|improve this answer
1  
Your blog post linked under the horrible link is exactly what I was trying to achieve, method overload for a class, value and a nullable with the same name. –  Boris B. Sep 21 '12 at 12:10
1  
@BorisB., one note is that if Jon is calling it horrible please dont implement it! –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 21 '12 at 12:12
    
The "horrible" code could be improved somewhat by defining a dummy interface with a struct constraint, and using that as a dummy parameter rather than a T?. Unlike e.g. a Drawing.Rectangle? which would take 20 bytes, the interface would only take four. As for it being "horrible", it confines the nastiness to a small helper method and in most contexts the performance hit shouldn't be too bad. –  supercat Jul 31 '13 at 15:32
    
@supercat: It still involves the overloaded method having a parameter solely for the purpose of signature differentation, which counts as horrible to me. Renaming the method is a much better option, IMO. –  Jon Skeet Jul 31 '13 at 15:33
1  
@JonSkeet: I share your distaste for passing a dummy parameter, but in cases where the semantics of the method should be the same regardless of parameter type (e.g. bool TryConvert<T>(o as Object, out T result)) having the compiler auto-select among struct-only, class-only, and universal methods would seem cleaner than requiring calling code to use different names (especially since there would be no diagnostic if a slower universal method was used where a faster one could have been inferred). –  supercat Jul 31 '13 at 15:46

This is not possible.

Generic constraints are not considered to be part of the method signature for purposes of overloading.

If you want to allow both value types and reference types, why constrain at all?

share|improve this answer
1  
To avoid jumping through the hoops of if (typeof(T)... (which can/should be resolved statically btw. and optimized away). Also it's not just class/struct combo, it's also where T:Foo/where T:Bar. –  Boris B. Sep 21 '12 at 12:00
    
The fact that a method is available for use with a reference type or with a value type does not imply that the same method should be used in either case. As a simple example, suppose one wanted to write a method bool TryCasting<T>(object it, out T result);. If T is a class type, the method can try it as T; if it's a value type, it as T?. If T can't be inferred either way, one may have to use Reflection to select a method, but if it can be inferred at compile doing, doing so would boost performance. –  supercat Jul 31 '13 at 15:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.