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I have a table structure like this:

CREATE TABLE `test` (
  `a` tinyint(3) unsigned DEFAULT 0,
  `b` tinyint(3) unsigned DEFAULT 0,
   `c` tinyint(3) unsigned DEFAULT 0,
  `d` tinyint(3) unsigned DEFAULT 0,
  `e` tinyint(3) unsigned DEFAULT 0
  );

This has about 30 columns with some columns that have values from 0-200 (a,b) and some only have 5 values (0,1,2,3,4) (column c-d). There are aprox. 120k rows in the table.

To show the number of items per row I use a query for each column:

select a, count(*) FROM test group by a;
select b, count(*) FROM test group by b;
select c, count(*) FROM test group by c;
select d, count(*) FROM test group by d;
select e, count(*) FROM test group by e;

The problem with this is that it will fire 30 queries (one per column) and basically goes over the same set of data each time.

Is there a better way to do this?

I have tried with GROUP BY WITH ROLLUP but this results in a massive resultset which is slower to process than each individual query.

You can view a selection of the data on SQLfiddle: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/a9fd8/1

share|improve this question
    
Everytime Using temporary; Using filesort can you add sorted indices on your columns? –  edze Sep 24 '12 at 13:43
    
on which one should I add an index? On all? Also note, that there are some other fields which are searched on (I do have an index on those). –  Nin Sep 24 '12 at 14:04
2  
Yes, one ordered index for each column you need to group. If you group by a, then MySQL start to sort your table by a and so on. I think this is your bottleneck. –  edze Sep 24 '12 at 15:30
    
That would basically mean indexing the whole table. And then still, it needs to do 30 queries. –  Nin Sep 24 '12 at 16:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+25

Maybe something like this will work faster.

select qq, q, count(*) from
(
select 'a' qq, a q FROM test
union all select 'b' qq, b q FROM test
union all select 'c' qq, c q FROM test
union all select 'd' qq, d q FROM test
union all select 'e' qq, e q FROM test
) t
group by qq, q;
share|improve this answer
    
performance is the same –  Nin Sep 24 '12 at 14:10
select 'a' as `column`, a as data, count(*) 
FROM test 
group by 'a', a
union
select 'b', b, count(*) 
FROM test 
group by 'b', b
union
select 'c', c, count(*) 
FROM test 
group by 'c', c
union
select 'd', d, count(*) 
FROM test 
group by 'd', d
union
select 'e', e, count(*) 
FROM test 
group by 'e', e

Don't know if it is any better but at least the planner will have a chance to optimize it.

share|improve this answer
    
This performs almost the same as the original (actually slightly slower). –  Nin Sep 21 '12 at 12:36

EDIT: this answer is completely off track

Try the following; it is a cleaner query, with just one pass, but I'm not sure how well it will perform due to the DISTINCT:

SELECT 
  COUNT(DISTINCT a) AS a,
  COUNT(DISTINCT b) AS b,
  COUNT(DISTINCT c) AS c,
  COUNT(DISTINCT d) AS d,
FROM
  t
;
share|improve this answer
    
but that will give me only the number of different items, not the value of those items with its counts. –  Nin Sep 27 '12 at 12:19
    
Whoops. My bad; completely off track –  Shlomi Noach Sep 28 '12 at 8:25

Nothing original, but you could try this one.

SELECT t.col, t.val, t.c FROM
(
    SELECT 'a' col, a val, count(*) c FROM test GROUP BY a
    UNION ALL
    SELECT 'b' col, b val, count(*) c FROM test GROUP BY b
    UNION ALL
    SELECT 'c' col, c val, count(*) c FROM test GROUP BY c
    UNION ALL
    SELECT 'd' col, d val, count(*) c FROM test GROUP BY d
    UNION ALL
    SELECT 'e' col, e val, count(*) c FROM test GROUP BY e
) t

But if performance is issue here I would like to suggest the same thing @edze suggested - index on columns (yes all 30). It will cost space, but increase performance. Or even create view table

CREATE TABLE `test_view` (
   `col` char(1), 
   `value` tinyint(3), 
   `count` int
);

for this task and then just do simple select if it is performed often.

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Depending on the ecology here it might be more efficient to build a table of aggregate data once and then keep it up to date whenever this table is modified. Your aggregate data table would have one row for each (present) value, and then 30 additional columns of counts. Then you can put in triggers on the original that update the counts. Naturally that will slow down write operations on the original table, although so will adding 30 indexes.

share|improve this answer
    
Adding an index on a column with only 5 distinct values doesn't help since MySQL will probably ignore that index. An aggregate table sounds good but in this case I already select a subset of this table based on some columns so an aggregate table can't be done in this case. –  Nin Oct 1 '12 at 7:30

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