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Hello newbie java programmer here, this is probably a really silly question but im having a problem adding multiple JLabels to my view. They seem to be covering each other. i've been reading about the three layout managers but i cant seem to find an easy tutorial on them.

    //Size and positioning
    setSize(500,400);
    setLocationRelativeTo(null);

    //Set Frame Background color

    //Set Labels
    JLabel labelTitle = new JLabel("<html><center>My CD/DVD Collection</center></html>",null,JLabel.CENTER);
    labelTitle.setFont(new Font("Arial",0 , 28));
    labelTitle.setVerticalAlignment(JLabel.TOP);
    add(labelTitle);
    labelTitle.setBorder(BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder( 50 /*top*/, 0, 0, 0 ));

    JLabel labelContent = new JLabel("<html><center> created by Daniel Del Core <br> Java</center></html>",null,JLabel.CENTER);

    add(labelContent);

Thanks for any help :)

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3 Answers 3

Your code is adding the elements directly to a JFrame or JDialog, which by default have a BorderLayout, so all your labels end up in BorderLayout.CENTER. This is why they overlap.

Here is an example of using a FlowLayout for your code. Note that I am using a panel to add labels to and the panel is added to the content pane of your window.

JPanel panel = new JPanel();
panel.setLayout(new FlowLayout());
//Set Labels
JLabel labelTitle = new JLabel("<html><center>My CD/DVD Collection</center></html>",null,JLabel.CENTER);
labelTitle.setFont(new Font("Arial",0 , 28));
labelTitle.setVerticalAlignment(JLabel.TOP);
panel.add(labelTitle);
labelTitle.setBorder(BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder( 50 /*top*/, 0, 0, 0 ));

JLabel labelContent = new JLabel("<html><center> created by Daniel Del Core <br> for <br> Java Programming and Applications</center></html>",null,JLabel.CENTER);
panel.add(labelContent);
getContentPane().add(panel);
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Great stuff! I finally understand what the panels are about now :) –  Daniel D C Sep 21 '12 at 12:17

I am guessing that you are calling these methods against a JFrame. When you call add() on a JFrame, you actually add the components to the content pane of the JFrame (JFrame.getContentPane()). By default, the content pane uses a BorderLayout. When you add a component without constraints to a container that uses the BorderLayout, you add them to the center. Since only one component at a time can be displayed in the center, you only see one of them.

Try this (just to see the effect):

getContentPane().setLayout(new FlowLayout());

And take a look at these tutorials:

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Much appreciated :) –  Daniel D C Sep 21 '12 at 12:14

In addition to the other answers, if you want to vertically stack Swing components, use the BoxLayout layout manager. For more information, see How to Use BoxLayout.

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