Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Possible Duplicate:
Template deduction for function based on its return type?

I am trying to figure out how C++ templates work. As an example, I want to write a simple data structure, triple which behaves like STL's pair but has three items. Of course, I want to implement it using templates. And I am facing a strange behaviour from my point of view.

First, I have a working example. Here is the C++ code that works:

template<typename T1, typename T2>
T1 getSum(T1 a1, T2 a2) {
    return a1 + a2;
}

int main(int argc, int *argv[]) {
    long l1 = 1, l2 = 0, l3 = 0, l4 =0;
    short s1 = 2, s2 = 0, s3 = 0, s4 = 0;
    l2 = getSum(l1, s1);
    l3 = getSum(s1, l1);
    l4 = getSum(1, 2);
    s2 = getSum(l1, s1);
    s3 = getSum(s1, l1);
    s4 = getSum(1, 2);
    cout << l2 << " " << l3 << " " << l4 << endl;
    cout << s2 << " " << s3 << " " << s4 << endl;
    return 0;
}

The result of this program is two lines containing 3 3 3 each. Since I call getSum function with various combination of arguments: (long, short), (short, long) and (integer literal, integer literal) and the return value is assigned into both long and short variables each time, I assume that compiler knows how to make an appropriate conversion or guessing of types by return values (in case of integer literals) each time.

And here we come back to simple triple implementation. I do everything in pretty the same way (as it seems to me) but I get a conversion error. Here is what I mean. My code looks like the following:

template <typename T1, typename T2, typename T3>
struct triple {
    T1 first;
    T2 second;
    T3 third;
};

template <typename T1, typename T2, typename T3>
triple<T1, T2, T3> mt(T1 f, T2 s, T3 t) {
    triple<T1, T2, T3> tr;
    tr.first = f;
    tr.second = s;
    tr.third = t;
    return tr;
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    triple<char, char, unsigned short> t = mt(0, 0, 65000);
    cout << t.first << " " << t.second << " " << t.third << endl;
    return 0;
}

However, when I try to compile it, I get the following error:

22: error: conversion from 'triple<int, int, int>' to non-scalar type
'triple<char, char, short unsigned int>' requested

(22nd line is the first line of main function).

It is not surprise that conversion between two aforementioned triples is not a compiler's business. But it is a surprise for me that compiler cannot determine that since I want to get triple<char, char, short unsigned int> as a result of mt function, template arguments should be determined as T1 == char, T2 == char, T3 == unsigned short.

And since things work this way now, I'm confused about how make_pair function works. Its code looks very alike to mine (again, as it seems to me).

So, my question is: please, clarify the essential differences between my code and working one :)

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by DCoder, martin clayton, 0x7fffffff, Kay, Mihai Iorga Sep 22 '12 at 2:27

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem in your case is that your function mt has a fixed return type already: Triple<int, int, int> (determined by the parameters, and integer constants are always considered to be int unless specified otherwise). Once created that way, it can't be assigned, since it's a different type, and there is no type conversion or constructor defined which would allow what you're trying to do.

At the moment, there's no constructor at all explicitly defined in your triple strucht - which means there's only default constructor and the copy constructor (which works only for the exact same type)!

But there is a solution:Take a look at the definition of pair: See the copy constructor (which is templated again, in addition to the template parameters on the base class). To make it work for your case, add your own templated copy constructor:

template <typename T1, typename T2, typename T3>
struct triple {
    template <typename U1, typename U2, typename U3>    
    triple(U1 f, U2 s, U3 t):
        first(f),
        second(s),
        third(t) {}
    T1 first;
    T2 second;
    T3 third;
};

Instead of using a function returning a triple, you could also simply use another constructor taking the three parameters:

template <typename T1, typename T2, typename T3>
struct triple {
    triple(T1 f, T2 s, T3 t):
        first(f),
        second(s),
        third(t) {}
    T1 first;
    T2 second;
    T3 third;
};

and then in main you could write:

triple<char, char, unsigned short> t(0, 0, 65000);

It's also less to write!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I get that. But that is another way to do what I want to do. And I would like to know why my way does not work – just to understand how templating system is organized. –  ikostia Sep 21 '12 at 12:31
    
updated my answer - hope it's clear now –  codeling Sep 21 '12 at 12:35
    
Yes, thank you. –  ikostia Sep 21 '12 at 12:57

The reason it works for std::pair is not due to the functionality of std::make_pair, but instead is due to one of the extra constructors std::pair has.

Looking at the list of pair constructors, you will find that #4 is

template< class U1, class U2 >
pair( const pair<U1,U2>& p );

This allows std::pair to be initialized from any other pair, as long as U1 is convertible to T1, and U2 is convertible to T2.

To make it work with your triple, you would have to add the same sort of constructors/assignment operators. Note, std::tuple or boost::tuple already provide that functionality if they are available to you.

share|improve this answer

To provide some clarification on the compiler error, the reason it does not occur with std::pair and make_pair is that std::pair has a template constructor that accepts std::pair of any type.

Changing to the following code will mirror std::pair much more and resolve the compiler error:

template <typename T1, typename T2, typename T3>
struct triple {
    T1 first;
    T2 second;
    T3 third;

    triple() {}

    template <typename U1, typename U2, typename U3>
    triple(const triple<U1, U2, U3>& rhs)
      : first(rhs.first),
        second(rhs.second),
        third(rhs.third)
    {}
};
share|improve this answer

In general, C++ does not infer a return type based on how that type is used. Rather, it infers the return type from what you tell it the return type is.

template<typename T1, typename T2>
T1 getSum(T1 a1, T2 a2)

Here, the code says that the return type is the same type as the first argument, T1. The thing with arithmetic types is that there are implicit conversions between them, so all of the assignment statements in the code work, either because the return type is the same as the type being assigned to, or because the return type can be converted to the type being assigned to.

template <typename T1, typename T2, typename T3>
triple<T1, T2, T3> mt(T1 f, T2 s, T3 t)

Here, the code tells the compiler that the return type is a triple whose three elements have the same types as the three arguments to the function. The call mt(0, 0, 65000) has three arguments of type int, so the return type is triple<int, int, int>.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.