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I'm trying create a command to open xterm and then change the directory that shows xterm by default.

I'm pressing Alt+F2 and then i run xterm | cd /home/tirengarfio/Music, but it doesn't change the directory...

I know that i could change the default directory that xterm shows by default, but I'm interested in do it dynamic: this time I want to go Music but the next time I will be interested in another folder..

Any idea?

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3 Answers 3

If that is the literal command you're running, I don't understand your reasoning. Pipes are for sending text data between processes, and that's not at all what you're trying to do.

You should pass xterm the -e option to start the desired shell, and then pass the shell a suitable option to set the initial directory.

Assuming bash, something like xterm -e /usr/bin/bash -c "cd /home/tirengarfio/Music" should be close, you might need to tweak the quoting. The absolute path to the bash binary might be wrong too, that can be made cleaner but I wanted to keep it simple so I stuck with the absolute.

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or, try cd /some/dir; xterm –  Wug Sep 21 '12 at 14:28
    
@Wug That assumes the command execution is being done by a shell though, for the ; separator to work. –  unwind Sep 21 '12 at 14:34
    
Well, the question is tagged "bash". –  Wug Sep 21 '12 at 15:15

Maybe the thing you want to do is:

xterm & cd /home/tirengarfio/Music

I'm not sure why so i cant give you a deep explanation. But i've used it before.

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If I'm not mistaken, that will execute xterm BEFORE changing directories. –  Wug Sep 21 '12 at 15:04
    
It seem to be working fine when i use it. I think that execute xterm and cd in the correct order but i really don't know what's happening inside. –  ferbuntu Sep 21 '12 at 15:34

For anyone stumbling on this, this works:

uxterm -e "cd /myfolder/anotherfolder && bash"

If I understand correctly, a terminal by itself is just an empty window that programs can display their output in. To be able to interact with it, you'll have to start a program in it, otherwise it will execute the commands it got from -e and immediately disappear. The most common program that gives you your much loved and missed default terminal style interaction is bash.

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