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I tried this:

class cls1{
    public:
    cls1(){ cout << "cls1 constructor\n";}
    cls1 (cls1 & o){ cout << "cls1 copy constructor\n";}
};

class cls2{
public:
    cls2 () { cout << "cls2 constructor\n";}
    cls2 (cls2 & o){ cout << "cls2 copy constructor\n";}
};

class my_cls{ 
public: 
    cls1 o1;
    cls2 o2;
    my_cls(){ cout << "my_cls constructor\n";}
    my_cls(my_cls& o){ cout << "my_cls copy constructor\n";}    
};    

void f(my_cls o){}

int main(){
    my_cls p;
    f(p);
    return 0;
}

but the output is:

cls1 constructor
cls2 constructor
my_cls constructor
cls1 constructor
cls2 constructor 
my_cls copy constructor

I find this confusing since I've been told that for each member, the copy-constructor invokes the copy-constructor for that member, execpt for premitive types, when a bit-by-bit copy is made. (I expected cls1 and cls2's copy constructors to be called before my_cls's copy constructor)

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2  
This doesn't compile. What is der?? –  Kerrek SB Sep 21 '12 at 14:37
    
I replaced der with my_class because initially, my_class was derived from the first two. But I changed my mind about that, after I asked the question, though. Sorry about it. Thanks for the changes, Luchian Grigore. –  Mihai Bogdan Sep 21 '12 at 17:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Actually:

der (der & o){ cout << "my_cls copy constructor\n";}    

is equivalent to

der (der & o):o1(),o2(){ cout << "my_cls copy constructor\n";}    

i.e. your copy constructor calls the default constructor of your class-type members.

To get it to behave like expected:

der (der & o):o1(o.o1),o2(o.o2){ cout << "my_cls copy constructor\n";}

To make it semantically correct:

der (der const& o)
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What you were told is only true for copy constructor generated by compiler.

If you are to write your own copy constructor you need to place copy c-tors of members and bases classes on initialization list, otherwise their default c-tors will be used.

In your example there are missing : o1(o.o1), o2(o.o2):

der (der & o)
: o1(o.o1)
, o2(o.o2)
{ cout << "my_cls copy constructor\n";}  
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oh, I understand now. Thanks! –  Mihai Bogdan Sep 21 '12 at 14:42

It is just like an initialization list for a regular constructor

class my_cls{ 
public: 
    cls1 o1;
    cls2 o2;
    my_cls (){ cout << "my_cls constructor\n";}
    my_cls (my_cls & o) : o1(o.o1), o2(o.o2) { cout << "my_cls copy constructor\n";}    
};
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