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I have a dictionary returned from a yaml configuration file with 4 levels:

item, sections, fields, elements

{
    "tag": "test", 
    "sections": [
        {
            "info": "This is section ONE", 
            "tag": "s1"
        }, 
        {
            "info": "This is section TWO", 
            "fields": [
                {
                    "info": "This is field ONE", 
                    "tag": "f1"
                }, 
                {
                    "info": "This is field TWO", 
                    "tag": "f2", 
                    "elements": [
                        {
                            "info": "This is element", 
                            "tag": "e1", 
                            "type_of": "text_field"
                        }, 
                        {
                            "info": "This is element", 
                            "tag": "e2", 
                            "type_of": "text_field"
                        }, 
                        {
                            "info": "This is element", 
                            "tag": "e3", 
                            "type_of": "text_field"
                        }, 
                        {
                            "info": "This is element", 
                            "tag": "e4", 
                            "type_of": "text_field"
                        }
                    ]
                }, 
                {
                    "info": "This is field THREE", 
                    "tag": "f3", 
                    "elements": [
                        {
                            "info": "This is element", 
                            "tag": "e5", 
                            "type_of": "text_field"
                        }, 
                        {
                            "info": "This is element", 
                            "tag": "e6", 
                            "type_of": "text_field"
                        }, 
                        {
                            "info": "This is element", 
                            "tag": "e7", 
                            "type_of": "text_field"
                        }, 
                        {
                            "info": "This is element ONE", 
                            "tag": "e8", 
                            "type_of": "text_field"
                        }
                    ]
                }
            ], 
            "tag": "s2"
        }, 
        {
            "info": "This is section THREE", 
            "fields": [
                {
                    "info": "This is field FOUR", 
                    "tag": "f4"
                }, 
                {
                    "info": "This is field FIVE", 
                    "tag": "f5"
                }, 
                {
                    "info": "This is field SIX", 
                    "tag": "f6"
                }
            ], 
            "tag": "s3"
        }
    ],
    "type_of": "custom"
}

class T():

    def __init__(self):
        self.sections = []
        self.fields = []
        self.elements = []

def rt(y):
    t = T()

    def recurse(y):
        for k,v in y.iteritems(): 
            if isinstance(v, list):
                getattr(t, k).append(v)
                [recurse(i) for i in v]
            else:
                setattr(t, k, v)
    recurse(y)
    return t

So I need to recurse a dictionary of lists of dictionaries that have lists of dictionaries, et. al., sort them into their types (and then add a reference to the piece it belongs to, but one problem at a time.) and put into an instance of T.

This works, but doesn't trim out anything, i.e. each section is captured, but all the rest (fields, elements) are captured. This probably comp sci 101, but I'm mostly teaching myself so this some sort of sorting algorithm I need to learn about. Any input on improving this appreciated.

EDIT: This turned out to be more in depth than I expected, and is abstractly more of an opportunity to learn how to walk through arbitrary data structures and pick out what I want or need

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This looks a lot like json. –  Andy Hayden Sep 21 '12 at 14:45
1  
What do you mean that it doesn't "trim out" anything? What output are you expecting? –  David Robinson Sep 21 '12 at 14:46
    
It sort of is json output, but close enough and more readable than what I had –  blueblank Sep 21 '12 at 16:43
    
The out put I get captures all pieces contained by a piece i.e. t.sections has all parts of sections it captures (fields and elements) and so on, but I just need to filter this I think. –  blueblank Sep 21 '12 at 16:44
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2 Answers 2

Try this, assuming that you want the elements of sections be instances of T again.

def rt(y, levels=1):
    t = T()
    for (k, v) in y.iteritems(): 
        if isinstance(v, list):
            if levels > 0:
                v = [rt(i, levels-1) if isinstance(i, dict) else i for i in v]
                setattr(t, k, v)
        else:
            setattr(t, k, v)
    return t

(edited to account for lists of non-dict elements, too, and to stop iteration after certain number of 'levels')

This will turn the nested dictionary into a hierarchy of nested instances of T, with attributes being created for each of the items in the dictionary. Using the level parameter you can adjust the 'depth' of the recursion: as soon as level==0 only atomic attributes will be included.

Or, if you want the elements of t.sections to be dicts instead of more instances of T:

def rt(y):
    t = T()
    for (k, v) in y.iteritems(): 
        if isinstance(v, list):
            # remove list elements from dicts in list
            v = [dict((k1, v1) for (k1, v1) in i.iteritems() if not isinstance(v1, list)) 
                 if isinstance(i, dict) else i for i in v]
        setattr(t, k, v)
    return t

If this is still not what you had in mind, please provide a concrete example of how the instance of T should look like for some dictionary.

share|improve this answer
    
I need each batch of pieces to work with so the I'm holding them in attributes of instance t while I work with them. This has basically turned into a separate class that I'm using to parse uploaded data so that I can create another set of db items from these pieces at this point, but see what you are indicating. –  blueblank Sep 21 '12 at 19:48
    
@blueblank I'm still not sure what exactly you want the code to do. Do you want to flatten the dict, so all the sections are contained in the same instance of T? Or do you want to filter out everything but the sections? Please provide an example how the result should look (maybe for a smaller input dictionary). –  tobias_k Sep 21 '12 at 20:19
    
An instance t of T should be as above: attributes contain a list of those items from the input -- sections is a list of sections in the files, etc. et al. As it is it is doing that, but also including the parts below it t.sections lists sections, fields, elements, t.fields contains fields and elements, elements contains only elements so that is good. –  blueblank Sep 21 '12 at 20:34
    
@blueblank You want the sections of t to contain only "atomic" attributes, like tag and info, but not their sections? Like a table of contents showing only the sections, but not the subsections? –  tobias_k Sep 21 '12 at 20:40
    
yes 'atomic' attributes is what I'm searching for as building block of what I'm trying to do –  blueblank Sep 22 '12 at 12:08
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Solution I came up with:

class Tree:
    def __init__(self, node, cargo, parent=None):
        self.node = node
        self.cargo = cargo
        self.parent  = parent
    def __str__(self):
        return str(self.cargo)

from copy import copy
def just_part(y):
    z = copy(y)
    for k,v in z.items():
        if isinstance(v, list):
            del z[k]
    return z

def rt(y):
    tt = []
    s = Tree( id(y), just_part(y) )
    tt.append(s)
    def recurse(y):
        for k,v in y.iteritems(): 
            if isinstance(v, list):
                [tt.append( Tree(id(i), just_part(i), id(y) ) ) for i in v]
                [recurse(i) for i in v]
            else:
                pass
    recurse(y)
    return tt

I just run rt(my nested dictionary), this returns a list of nodes which so far seems to be adequate a start for what I'm doing, and I know it can accomplished in a much more effective way. There is this: http://code.activestate.com/recipes/577982-recursively-walk-python-objects/ too, but it doesn't get at everything while my own solution maybe not the most pythonic works for now.

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