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Okay, let's assume for a minute I've got an API for an entity named Foo and it looks something like this:

.../api/foo (GET, PUT, POST) or (SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE internally)

And this works well for a lot of consumers, especially mobile devices since it's very concise and lightweight. Now let's assume, if we were to stick with REST, that an operation named ComeForth exists and it looks something like this:

.../api/foo/1/comeforth (POST) or (perform the come forth operation)

Okay, so we've got that, but now let's assume I need a bit more information from the consumer on that operation and so to keep it concise I'm just going to build a new resource that holds the Foo ID and some other information, named ComeForth and the API now looks like this:

.../api/comeforth (POST) or (perform the come forth operation)

Now, the previous API .../api/foo/1/comeforth seems okay to me, but the second one feels like I'm trying to fit a square peg into a round hole, and just because I can create resources on a whim doesn't mean I should. So, my questions are:

  1. Should I actually just be publishing a SOAP-based service for the ComeForth operation?
  2. If I do use SOAP, doesn't that have ramifications for consumers (i.e. it's a lot more work for consumers like JavaScript or mobile devices?
  3. Is it really a hard and fast rule that SOAP is operation-based and REST is entity-based? If so then even the API for .../api/foo/1/comeforth would be breaking that rule wouldn't it?

At any rate, I just want to make sure I'm using the right technology for the need.

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Typically you do not expose 'operations' on a REST service, the operation is the method (POST, PUT, DELETE, GET). You seem to mixing an RPC style with REST in what you outlined. Can you give a more concrete example and describe what ComeForth is returning? Is it a GET operation? –  Oppositional Sep 21 '12 at 15:09
    
@Oppositional, ComeForth is a very long running transaction and doesn't return anything in fact. –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 21 '12 at 15:22
1  
Your resource is probably not Foo then, but is a transaction that has a status. You could expose an async web API of /api/transactions and do a POST of Foo to it, which would return an id you could use to track the progress of the transaction by calling /transactions/{id} that returns true or false based on wether it has completed. –  Oppositional Sep 21 '12 at 15:38
    
@Oppositional, how about you add that last comment as an answer and maybe include some basic code snippets, that's a very interesting approach and on my collegues would be interested in. –  Michael Perrenoud Sep 21 '12 at 16:35
    
See the answer I posted, let me know if I need to clarify anything. –  Oppositional Sep 21 '12 at 19:31
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the case you are describing, the resource being operated upon is not Foo, but is instead a Transaction (based on your comments). You model a long running transaction against entities of type T (Foo) for a specific action type (ComeForth).

The controller accepts the transaction POST request for processing and returns a representation of the transaction that includes a unique identifier assigned to the transaction that can be used to track its progress.

Clients perform a GET operation to retrieve the status of the long running transaction using the unique identifier they received when the transaction was accepted for processing.

I chose use XML serialization for demo purposes but you could serialize the entity participating in the transaction as a byte array or whatever makes sense.

Example Web API:

/transactions/{id}

  • POST: Creates a new transaction for processing
  • GET: Retrieves the transaction with the specified id to verify if it has completed

Web API Service Model:

[DataContract()]
public class Transaction
{
    public Transaction()
    {
        this.Id = Guid.Empty;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or sets the unique identifier for this transaction.
    /// </summary>
    /// <value>
    /// A <see cref="Guid"/> that represents the unique identifier for this transaction.
    /// </value>
    [DataMember()]
    public Guid Id
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or sets a value indicating if this transaction has been completed.
    /// </summary>
    /// <value>
    /// <see langword="true"/> if this transaction has been completed; otherwise, <see langword="false"/>.
    /// </value>
    [DataMember()]
    public bool IsComplete
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or sets the action being performed.
    /// </summary>
    /// <value>The action being performed.</value>
    [DataMember()]
    public string Action
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or sets the serialized representation of the entity participating in the transaction.
    /// </summary>
    /// <value>The serialized representation of the entity participating in the transaction.</value>
    [DataMember()]
    public string Entity
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or sets the assembly qualified name of the entity participating in the transaction.
    /// </summary>
    /// <value>
    /// The <see cref="Type.AssemblyQualifiedName"/> of the <see cref="Entity"/>.
    /// </value>
    [DataMember()]
    public string EntityType
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Returns the <see cref="Entity"/> as a type of <typeparamref name="T"/>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">The type to project the <see cref="Entity"/> as.</typeparam>
    /// <returns>
    /// An object of type <typeparamref name="T"/> that represents the <see cref="Entity"/>.
    /// </returns>
    public T As<T>() where T : class
    {
        T result    = default(T);

        var serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));

        using (var reader = XmlReader.Create(new MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(this.Entity))))
        {
            result  = serializer.Deserialize(reader) as T;
        }

        return result;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Serializes the specified <paramref name="entity"/>.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">The type of entity being serialized.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="entity">The entity to serialize.</param>
    public static Transaction From<T>(T entity, string action = null) where T : class
    {
        var transaction = new Transaction();

        transaction.EntityType  = typeof(T).AssemblyQualifiedName;
        transaction.Action      = action;

        var serializer  = new XmlSerializer(typeof(T));
        byte[] data     = null;

        using (var stream = new MemoryStream())
        {
            serializer.Serialize(stream, entity);
            stream.Flush();

            data        = stream.ToArray();
        }

        transaction.Entity = Encoding.UTF8.GetString(data);

        return transaction;
    }
}

[DataContract()]
public class Foo
{
    public Foo()
    {

    }

    [DataMember()]
    public string PropertyA
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    [DataMember()]
    public int PropertyB
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    [DataMember()]
    public Foo PropertyC
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

TransactionsController:

public class TransactionsController : ApiController
{
    public TransactionsController() : base()
    {

    }

    private static ConcurrentDictionary<Guid, Transaction> _transactions = new ConcurrentDictionary<Guid, Transaction>();

    /// <summary>
    /// Using to initiate the processing of a transaction
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="transaction"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    [HttpPost()]
    public HttpResponseMessage Post(Transaction transaction)
    {
        if(transaction == null)
        {
            return this.Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, new HttpError("Unable to model bind request."));
        }

        transaction.Id  = Guid.NewGuid();

        // Execute asynchronous long running transaction here using the model.
        _transactions.TryAdd(transaction.Id, transaction);

        // Return response indicating request has been accepted fro processing
        return this.Request.CreateResponse<Transaction>(HttpStatusCode.Accepted, transaction);

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Used to retrieve status of a pending transaction.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="id"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    [HttpGet()]
    public HttpResponseMessage Get(Guid id)
    {
        Transaction transaction = null;

        if(!_transactions.TryGetValue(id, out transaction))
        {
            return this.Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.NotFound, new HttpError("Transaction does not exist"));
        }

        return this.Request.CreateResponse<Transaction>(HttpStatusCode.OK, transaction);
    }
}

Example client call to transactions controller:

var foo = new Foo()
{
    PropertyA   = "ABC",
    PropertyB   = 123,

    PropertyC   = new Foo()
    {
        PropertyA   = "DEF",
        PropertyB   = 456
    }
};

var transaction = Transaction.From<Foo>(foo, "ComeForth");

Guid pendingTransactionId = Guid.Empty;

// Initiate a transaction
using(var client = new HttpClient())
{
    client.BaseAddress  = new Uri("http://localhost:12775/api/", UriKind.Absolute);

    using (var response = client.PostAsJsonAsync<Transaction>("transactions", transaction).Result)
    {
        response.EnsureSuccessStatusCode();

        pendingTransactionId = response.Content.ReadAsAsync<Transaction>().Result.Id;
    }
}

// Retrieve status of transaction
Transaction pendingTransaction = null;

using (var client = new HttpClient())
{
    client.BaseAddress = new Uri("http://localhost:12775/api/", UriKind.Absolute);

    var requestUri = String.Format(null, "transactions\\{0}", pendingTransactionId.ToString());

    using (var response = client.GetAsync(requestUri).Result)
    {
        response.EnsureSuccessStatusCode();

        pendingTransaction = response.Content.ReadAsAsync<Transaction>().Result;
    }
}

// Check if transaction has completed
if(pendingTransaction.IsComplete)
{

}

So you can still use REST and the ASP.NET Web API to model the initiation of a long running process, you just need to represent the operation to execute as its own separate resource. Hope this helps you in your development efforts.

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To me this sounds like a very open ended question, and a lot of factors need to be taken into consideration.

REST is great when your calls match CRUD (Create, Retrieve, Update, Delete), take the example of Twitter, you can Create, Retrive, Update, and Delete twitter posts.

Now take into consideration a payment processor handling a transaction, you can Create one (ie pass a cc#), it will conditionally do something, and then likely return an transaction result (success or failure). You cannot really "update" a transaction, and "retreiving" one isn't really retreiving the data you sent it. You certainly can't "delete" a transaction, you may void one, or perform a refund (partial or full). For this example, REST does not make sense.

That's not to say that you couldn't have a hybrid of REST and operations. Where some entities conform to REST, but then there's additional methods (such as processing payments) where REST does not fit.

The decision to pick REST or SOAP, that should be determined by your target audience, a WCF service (which uses SOAP) is much easier to implement in .NET than REST, and probably vice versa if the consuming technology is ruby.

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1  
a WCF service (which uses SOAP) is much easier to implement in .NET than REST, don't agree much, ASP. NET Web API is really simple to build REST, and comsume via REST is also simpler compared to SOAP –  Cuong Le Sep 21 '12 at 15:22
    
@CuongLe I mean't both sides of the coin, WCF (in my opinion) is much easier to consume in .NET. WCF generating a wsdl file that .NET will autogenerate classes for you is invaluable. –  Matthew Sep 21 '12 at 15:23
    
REST is always easy to be consumed, why because REST bases directly on HTTP, if you use SOAP, you need to have SOAP parsers from consumer, ex: consume from javascript to SOAP would be complex. Did you try ASP.NET Web API? –  Cuong Le Sep 21 '12 at 15:29
    
Yes, I have used both, my answer is an open ended one that is designed to have the reader determine the best approach for themselves. My answer was not indended to be a REST vs SOAP discussion. REST is not better than SOAP in every scenario, and vice versa. –  Matthew Sep 21 '12 at 15:39
1  
SOAP based services are transport agile (you can expose the same service over different transport protocols) but you are locked into SOAP as you media type representation. REST services are media type agile (you can return service model entities as JSON, XML, etc.) but are locked into using HTTP as your transport protocol. You probably tend to have wider reach with REST and can leverage the capabilities of HTTP. But what type of service you create is always related to the needs of the consumers/producers. –  Oppositional Sep 21 '12 at 20:00
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