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So I want to toggle the most significant bit of my number. Here is an example:

x = 100101 then answer should be 00101

I have a 64 bit machine and hence I am not expecting the answer to be 100000..<51 0's>..100101 One way I thought of was to count the number of bits in my number and then toggle the MSB, but not sure on how to count.

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1  
Toggle the last bit set? MSB is something different. – user7116 Sep 21 '12 at 15:10
1  
What should the result be if no bit is set? – Daniel Fischer Sep 21 '12 at 15:11
    
You want to toggle the most significant bit or to zero the most significant bit that is one? If you want to zero the most significant bit that is one, how many bits are in the type of x? Is it 16, 32 or 64 bits or something else? – Analog File Sep 21 '12 at 15:21
    
@sixlettervariables: Well, in this context how would I define it? MSB would be the first bit of the number from the right. But the thing is I do not want to consider all 64 bits. – noMAD Sep 21 '12 at 15:27
2  
'... the first bit of the number from the right.', you mixed it up, didn't you? I'd say: ... from the left. @noMAD – alk Sep 21 '12 at 15:33
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The cheat is to pawn it off to the compiler: There are instructions in most CPUs for doing work like this.

The following should do what you want.

i ^ (1 << (sizeof i * CHAR_BIT - clz(i) - 1))

This will translate into the CLZ instruction, which counts the leading zeros.

For GCC, see: http://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-4.1.2/gcc/Other-Builtins.html

One thing to be careful of is that this results in undefined behavior if i == 0.

You should replace clz() with the correct intrinsic for your compiler, In GCC this is __builtin_clz; in Visual Studio C++ this is _BitScanForward.

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ffs find the first set one starting from the least significant bit. There should be (sizeof(i)*8 - clz(i)) instead. – Eldar Abusalimov Sep 21 '12 at 15:49
    
@EldarAbusalimov You're correct, I've fixed my answer. Thank you. – jleahy Sep 21 '12 at 15:52
    
What is clz()? Which headers are needed for it? – Kerrek SB Sep 21 '12 at 16:01
    
@KerrekSB it is GCC intrinsic, there is no need to include any header to access it. You can use __builtin_clz alias instead. See also my answer for a generic implementation of clz. – Eldar Abusalimov Sep 21 '12 at 16:05
1  
@KerrekSB CLZ is a commonly provided concept. It's __builtin_clz in gcc, clz in OpenCL, _BitScanForward in Visual C++, etc. – jleahy Sep 21 '12 at 16:15

@jleahy has already posted a good option in case of using GCC, I would only leave here a generic implementation of clz which does not use any compiler intrinsics. However, it is not the optimal choice for CPUs which already have native instructions for counting bits (such as x86).

#define __bit_msb_mask(n) (~(~0x0ul >> (n)))   /* n leftmost bits. */

/* Count leading zeroes. */
int clz(unsigned long x) {
    int nr = 0;
    int sh;

    assert(x);

    /* Hope that compiler optimizes out the sizeof check. */
    if (sizeof(x) == 8) {
        /* Suppress "shift count >= width of type" error in case
         * when sizeof(x) is NOT 8, i.e. when it is a dead code anyway. */
        sh = !(x & __bit_msb_mask(sizeof(x)*8/2)) << 5;
        nr += sh; x <<= sh;
    }

    sh = !(x & __bit_msb_mask(1 << 4)) << 4; nr += sh; x <<= sh;
    sh = !(x & __bit_msb_mask(1 << 3)) << 3; nr += sh; x <<= sh;
    sh = !(x & __bit_msb_mask(1 << 2)) << 2; nr += sh; x <<= sh;
    sh = !(x & __bit_msb_mask(1 << 1)) << 1; nr += sh; x <<= sh;
    sh = !(x & __bit_msb_mask(1 << 0)) << 0; nr += sh;

    return nr;
}

Using this function one can toggle the most significant set bit (assuming there is such one) as follows:

x ^= 1ul << (sizeof(x)*8 - clz(x))
share|improve this answer

Here's an approach using a lookup table, assuming CHAR_BIT == 8:

uint32_t toggle_msb(uint32_t n)
{
    static unsigned char const lookup[] =
                         { 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 };

    for (unsigned int i = 0; i != sizeof n; ++i)
    {
        // omit the last bit for big-endian machines: ---VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV
        unsigned char * p
                 = reinterpret_cast<unsigned char *>(&n) + sizeof n - i - 1;

        if (*p / 16 != 0) { *p = *p % 16 + (lookup[*p / 16] * 16); return n; }
        if (*p % 16 != 0) { *p = 16 * (*p / 16) + lookup[*p % 16]; return n; }
    }

    return 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your lookup is running off the end of your static array, giving you undefined results... – Chris Dodd Sep 21 '12 at 15:49
    
@ChrisDodd: That's because I meant to split it into two nibbles. Fixed! – Kerrek SB Sep 21 '12 at 15:51
    
The problem with this is that the compiler has no way of optimizing it. If you can't use the intrinsics I much prefer the approach of @EldarAbusalimov. – jleahy Sep 21 '12 at 16:18
    
@jleahy: Yeah, this solution is probably the most terrible of the answers on offer here. – Kerrek SB Sep 21 '12 at 16:38

And to just put it all together in some sample code for GCC:

#include <stdio.h>

#define clz(x)  __builtin_clz(x)

int main()
{
    int i = 411;    /* 110011011 */

    if( i != 0 )
        i ^= (1 << (sizeof(i)*8 - clz(i)-1));

    /* i is now 10011011 */
    printf("i = %d\n", i);
    return(0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
And the reason for the downvote? Is there no value is showing what others have said in a complete code example? – Chimera Sep 24 '12 at 18:20
    
The obvious thing I'd change right off would be using CHAR_BIT instead of 8, but I don't think that's nearly serious enough to justify a down-vote. – Jerry Coffin Sep 24 '12 at 18:44
    
I thought maybe a downvote because I took and expanded upon a comment? – Chimera Sep 24 '12 at 18:51
    
I dunno. I don't see much to really justify a lot of votes in either direction. – Jerry Coffin Sep 24 '12 at 19:38
    
So perhaps the down vote was to undo the single upvote. – Chimera Sep 24 '12 at 19:39

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