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I am trying to wrap the code needed to iterate through the subscriber list of an event delegate into a static helper routine, so that I don't need to copy/paste the same code for many event handlers. I am still learning the ins and outs of C#, and I'm stumbling over the details.

The helper routine will iterate through the event subscriber list and invoke each subscriber individually so that the subscriber's thread can be synchronized automatically. Many of the events will be subscribed from various Forms in the GUI, so this eliminates the need for managing thread synchronization of the event in each Form class.

The code below shows an example of the concept. The last line....

singleCast.Invoke(paramList);

... is obviously not valid for a couple of reasons.

How can I invoke each subscriber without using the DynamicInvoke method which I understand is extremely slow ?

Is there a way to pass in a type reference so that the ForEach returns specific event Delegates versus generic Delegates ?

See example code below:

namespace Reflection_Diagnostics
{
    // ***********************
    // *** Event Delegates ***
    // ***********************

    public delegate void SystemPoll();
    public delegate void SystemStart(int option);
    public delegate void SystemEnd();

    class clsTestEvents
    {
        // **************
        // *** Events ***
        // **************

        public event SystemPoll Event_SystemPoll;
        public event SystemStart Event_SystemStart;
        public event SystemEnd Event_SystemEnd;

        // ***********************
        // *** Event Overrides ***
        // ***********************

        private void OnEvent_SystemPoll()  // Event Override
        {
            MyToolBox.SyncEvents(Event_SystemPoll);
        }

        private void OnEvent_SystemStart(int option)  // Event Override
        {
            MyToolBox.SyncEvents(Event_SystemStart, option);
        }

        private void OnEvent_SystemEnd()  // Event Override
        {
            MyToolBox.SyncEvents(Event_SystemEnd);
        }

        // ***********************
        // *** Test The Events ***
        // ***********************

        public void TestTheEvents()
        {
            Event_SystemPoll();
            Event_SystemStart(1);
            Event_SystemEnd();
        }
    }

    public class MyToolBox
    {
        // *******************
        // *** Sync Events ***
        // *******************
        // Iterate through the event subscriber list and synchronize to the subscriber thread when needed

        static public void SyncEvents(Delegate handler,  params object[] paramList)
        {
            if (null != handler)
            {
                foreach (Delegate singleCast in handler.GetInvocationList())
                {
                    ISynchronizeInvoke syncInvoke = singleCast.Target as ISynchronizeInvoke;
                    try
                    {
                        if ((syncInvoke != null) && (syncInvoke.InvokeRequired))
                        {
                            syncInvoke.Invoke(singleCast, paramList);   // Subscriber is on a different thread
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            // Error:  System.Delegate does not contain a definition for 'Invoke'.....
                            // singleCast is a generic Delegate, and so cannot be directly invoked.
                            // DynamicInvoke is avialable, but is much, MUCH, MUCH!! slower to execute

                            singleCast.Invoke(paramList);  // Subscriber is on the same thread
                        } 
                    }
                    catch
                    {
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
If you simply have an event delegate, how do you know what thread the subscriber is using? –  Peter Ritchie Sep 21 '12 at 15:40
    
My understanding is that GetInvocationList returns the list of subscribers, each of which has a reference to the Target object returned by singleCast.Target. InvokeRequired is then used to determine if the subscriber is on the same thread. This code is based on other internet examples - I am still learning here. –  user1689175 Sep 21 '12 at 15:51
    
Okay, that's a little different. Code that access Windows controls needs to be executed on the one main (UI) thread. That's kinda different from the "subscriber's thread". Typically, the event handler (i.e. not the code that invokes the handler) deals with checking InvokeRequired. –  Peter Ritchie Sep 21 '12 at 15:57
    
One of the problems with what you're trying to do is that not every delegate will have a Target. Events that have an anonymous delegate or static method subscribed to an event will have a null Target--but they still may have code that needs to be called through Control.InvokeRequired –  Peter Ritchie Sep 21 '12 at 16:11
    
BTW, manual invocation of event handlers is always going to be slower. –  Peter Ritchie Sep 21 '12 at 16:13

1 Answer 1

It's not clear what you're asking. You don't have to use DynamicInvoke method, you can simply "call" the delegate:

foreach (EventHandler<EventArgs> subscriber in handler.GetInvocationList())
{
    ISynchronizeInvoke control = null;
    if (subscriber.Target != null)
    {
        control = subscriber.Target as ISynchronizeInvoke;
    }
    if (control != null)
    {
        if (control.InvokeRequired)
        {
            control.BeginInvoke(subscriber, new object[] {this, EventArgs.Empty});
            continue;
        }
    }
    subscriber(this, EventArgs.Empty); // just "call"
}

But, your sample code didn't use DynamicInvoke, so I'm not clear what the problem is.

Even with your sample code or the above code, you'll sometimes nave no instance (Target) to call InvokeRequired on, For example:

    button1.Click += button1_Click;
//...

private static void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Button button = sender as Button;
    if (button == null) throw new InvalidOperationException();
    DoSomeAsyncOperation();
}

or

button1.Click += (o, args) =>
                    {
                    DoSomethingOnClick();
                    };

So, really, you only get what you want sometimes and the users of your framework still have to deal InvokeRequired sometimes. Plus, you're letting them create code that will be different than almost every other implementation on winforms or WPF, making it harder to learn. In addition, the "hidden" asynchronous invoke will be just that: hidden--making it harder to debug.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the code. To address your comment about the DynamicInvoke: Replacing: 'singleCast.Invoke(paramList);' with 'singleCast.DynamicInvoke(paramList);' will compile and run and functions as I wanted it, however it is slow. I was trying to accomplish the same thing without using DynamicInvoke. The example that you provided produces the error: Unable to cast object of type Reflection_Diagnostics.SystemPoll to type System.EventHandler. The casting has been the crux of my problem. I will consider other options unless there is a way to adjust my original code. Thanks. –  user1689175 Sep 21 '12 at 18:40
    
For one, an Action delegate (which is what SystemPoll is equivalent to) is not assignable to an EventHandler delegate (hence the exception). Do you want to support standard events or just multicast delegates? –  Peter Ritchie Sep 21 '12 at 18:47
    
Only multicast delegates. Thanks. –  user1689175 Sep 21 '12 at 19:26

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