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I'm trying to simulate a coin flip using the code below.

public class Coin
{
    public static double result;
        int[] count = new count[2];

    public static void flip()
    {       
        result = Math.random();
    }

        public static boolean isHeads()
        {
        if (result == 0.0)
        {
                    count[0]++;
            return false;
        }

        else
        {
                    count[1]++;
            return true;
        }
        }

        public static void main(String[] args)
        {
             flip();
             isHeads();
             System.out.println(count[0]);
             System.out.println(count[1]);
        }
}

For some reason Eclipse says that the

import java.util.Random;

is never used even though I'm clearly using it. I didn't put my for loop into the code above but it loops n number of times and then outputs the result. No matter how many times it loops it always returns that the result is greater than 0.0 which can't be right. Am I calling Math.random incorrectly?

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12  
Math.Random and java.util.Random are not the same thing! –  gtgaxiola Sep 21 '12 at 15:36
1  
They are different things, Eclipse is right. –  Arran Sep 21 '12 at 15:36
3  
result == 0.0 is far less likely than I think you think it is. –  Flexo Sep 21 '12 at 15:37
    
What is the issue? The warning or the "result is always greater then 0.0"? The probability of getting a random to be 0.0 is very slim in double arithmetics, and is 0 in real numbers arithmetics. –  amit Sep 21 '12 at 15:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'll recomend using

java.util.Random

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    Random rand = new Random();

    int headCount = 0;
    int tailCount = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        int value = rand.nextInt(2);

        if (value == 0) {
            System.out.println("Heads");
            headCount++;
        } else {
            System.out.println("Tails");
            tailCount++;
        }
    }

    System.out.println("Head Count: " + headCount);
    System.out.println("Tail Count: " + tailCount);

}
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1  
How about a count[value]++ –  David Grant Sep 21 '12 at 15:41
3  
If you have value = rand.nextInt(2);, you know that value is either 0 or 1. The test value % 2 == 0 is then unnecessarily complicated, value == 0 is clearer. –  Daniel Fischer Sep 21 '12 at 15:43
    
@Daniel Fischer thanks! –  gtgaxiola Sep 21 '12 at 15:45
    
Why do you have to use .nextInt() ? Why won't .nextDouble() work? –  RandomlyKnighted Sep 21 '12 at 16:44
    
Both will work, is just a matter of creating a 50-50 chance of getting certain value to simulate a flip coin. –  gtgaxiola Sep 21 '12 at 17:19

You are using Math and it may be using Random, but you are not using Random anywhere.

No matter how many times it loops it always returns that the result is greater than 0.0 which can't be right. Am I calling Math.random incorrectly?

There is 2 ^ 53 possible values between 0.0 and 1.0 and as Random only uses a 48-bit seed, it is possible you could generate every double it will create and no one value ever occurs. If you use SecureRandom, you have a one in 2 ^ 53 chance of returning 0.0.

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Once you fix your compile issue, you'll discover that your "coin" is not fair: it gives you "tails" a lot more often than "heads". In fact, you'd rarely get any "heads" at all!

This is because random() gives you a double between 0 and 1, not an int of 0 and 1. Therefore you need to change your condition as follows:

if (result < 0.5) {
    count[0]++;
    return false;
} else {
    count[1]++;
    return true;
}
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1  
This is far more helpful than the initial answers. –  Flexo Sep 21 '12 at 15:41

Math.Random and java.util.Random are two different things.

static Random random = new Math.Random();
public static void flip()  {       
    result = random.nextDouble();
}

and

 public static boolean isHeads() {
    if (result > 0.5) {
       count[0]++;
       return false;
    }
    //else {
        count[1]++;
        return true;
    //}
}
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You should create an instance of util.Random and use it to generate your numbers.

You could replace

public static void flip()
{       
    result = Math.random();
}

by

static Random r = new Math.Random();
public static void flip()  {       
    result = r.nextDouble();
}

And as what you need is in fact a boolean, I'd suggest you use the nextBoolean method :

static Random r = new Math.Random();
static boolean result;
public static void flip()  {       
    result = r.nextBoolean();
}
public static boolean isHeads() {
    count[result?1:0]++;
    return result;
}
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1  
"create an instance of Math.Random" - did you mean util.Random? –  Flexo Sep 21 '12 at 15:39
1  
it's not Math.Random, dystroy ;) –  Fildor Sep 21 '12 at 15:39
    
@Flexo You're right... I had the link good at least ;) –  dystroy Sep 21 '12 at 15:40
    
Math of java does have a random() method, docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/lang/… –  gh. Sep 21 '12 at 15:47

Math.random() is a method in java.lang.Math class

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Maybe "random", not "Random" ? –  dystroy Sep 21 '12 at 15:49
    
yes, thanks for pointing.. its a typo –  PermGenError Sep 21 '12 at 15:49

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