Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following is a little script that simulates the sticky header effect seen on iOS devices.

$('.scrolllist').scroll(function(){
        $(this).find('ul').each(function(){
            if($(this).position().top <= 0){
                $(this).addClass('abs').find('strong').removeClass('mov');

                if($(this).position().top <= ($(this).height() * -1)){
                    $(this).removeClass('abs');
                    $(this).find('strong').addClass('mov');            
                }
                else {
                    $(this).addClass('abs');
                    $(this).find('strong').removeClass('mov');   
                }
            }
            else {
                $(this).removeClass('abs').find('strong').removeClass('mov');
            }
        });
    });

It changes the position of each element by changing its status from postion:absolute, top:0 to position:absolute, bottom:0; whilst also changing the containing <ul> from position:relative to position:static

SAMPLE: http://jsfiddle.net/dMJqj/80/

Is there anything that can be done to smoothen it up a bit. It looks a bit jerky on Chrome and Firefox and sometimes it can take a fraction of a second to trigger which is noticeable because the sticky header appears to flash.

share|improve this question
2  
Looks smooth in Chrome here. –  j08691 Sep 21 '12 at 16:25
4  
Looks quite smooth for me in FF and Chrome. I would be more annoyed by the strongs overlapping the scrollbar. –  Christoph Sep 21 '12 at 16:29
    
A potential issue here, is that your code is invalid. A ul can only have lielements as its direct children. So you would need to either wrap your strong tags in an li or you would need to move them outside of the ul. –  tw16 Sep 21 '12 at 16:31
    
@Christoph That is also annoying. Do you know how to stop it from doing that. –  Robin Knight Sep 21 '12 at 16:36
    
As Christoph already mentioned, your HTML is not valid. You can easily avoid that buy using normal <li>Elements and using a :first-child selector. Also, look a the following article by John Resig, in which he explains how to deal with scroll events: ejohn.org/blog/learning-from-twitter –  gregory Sep 24 '12 at 12:32

1 Answer 1

I'd imagine that the twitching you're seeing is a result of performance issues within jQuery and JavaScript

These articles are rich with some tips on optimizing the performance of your scripts:

Also -- more than that, it looks like the abs class is getting repeatedly added and remove at every firing of the scroll event when a list's position.top < 0

By itself that doesn't cause visual twitching but it does cause a small bit of memory to be burned unnecessarily.

Also as a few mentioned up above, your HTML was not valid.

See this fiddle with a few optimization techniques applied, valid HTML and removal of some unnecessary class manipulation:

http://jsfiddle.net/DW4pP/

share|improve this answer
    
I'm just +1ing this because I wrote one of the articles you linked and I'm an egotistical jerk. ;) –  Scottie Feb 8 '13 at 13:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.