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I have a table with fields id, votes(for each users), rating.

Task: Counting user rating based on votes for him and for others. that is, each time i update the field votes needed recalculation field rating.

Which means some can be on the 3rd place. voted for him and that he would be stood up to 2rd place, and the other vice versa - from 2 to 3. (in rating fiels)

How to solve this problem? Each time update the field to count users ratings on php and do a lot of update query in mysql is very expensive.

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can you show an example of your table values –  mrmryb Sep 21 '12 at 16:45
    
hm.. i doesn't have base. for example(id, votes, rating) 1, 124, 2 2, 85, 3 3, 999, 1 –  Kirill Speransky Sep 21 '12 at 16:49
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to get the ratings with a select without having a rating column, then this is the way. However from a performance perspective I cannot guarantee this will be your best option. The way it works is that if two users have the same amount of votes they will have the same rating and then it will skip ahead the necessary number for the next different rating:

set @rating:=0;
set @count:=1;

select id,
case when @votes<>votes then @rating:=@rating+@count
else @rating end as rating,
case when @votes=votes then @count:=@count+1
else @count:=1 end as count,
@votes:=votes as votes
from t1
order by votes desc

sqlfiddle

This gives you an extra column which you can ignore, or you could wrap this select in to a subquery and have:

select t2.id,t2.votes,t2.rating from (
select id,
case when @votes<>votes then @rating:=@rating+@count
else @rating end as rating,
case when @votes=votes then @count:=@count+1
else @count:=1 end as count,
@votes:=votes as votes
from t1
order by votes desc) as t2

but the sqlfiddle is strangely giving inconsistent results so you'd have to do some testing. If anyone knows why this is I'd be interested in knowing the reason.

If you want to get the rating for just one user then doing the subquery option and using a where after the from should give you the desired result. sqlfiddle - but again, inconsistent results, run it a few times and sometimes it gives rating as 10 other times as 30. I think testing in your db to see what happens will be best.

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The first solution I liked. –  Kirill Speransky Sep 21 '12 at 17:19
    
Great, glad i could help. Let me know if you need any more help with it, otherwise please accept an answer as correct with the tick next to the arrows. –  mrmryb Sep 21 '12 at 17:37
    
How about mysql triggers? They work faster than normal queries? –  Kirill Speransky Sep 21 '12 at 22:43
    
@KirillSperansky I'm no expert on triggers but I believe it won't be simple to get that done in a trigger, plus you'll have it running after every update which might end up having a decent performance cost. Triggers act on the rows that are being updated, so I don't know how you'd update the whole table, maybe by having the trigger run a stored procedure. You might be better off using a cron job in this case and updating the table every so often, but then your results won't always be up to date. –  mrmryb Sep 22 '12 at 15:18
    
@KirillSperansky The good thing about using a select is that you keep your results up to date and the extra performance cost of the case calculations will probably be quite minor when you'll have to be searching through the whole table anyway and having quite light-weight updates. If you do want a ratings column though or you'll have a relatively small amount of updates compared to selects, it might be worth asking a new question about how to do what you want specifically with a trigger. I'd be interested in seeing how too. –  mrmryb Sep 22 '12 at 15:23
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Well it depends on a lot of factors

  1. Do you have a large system that is growing exponentially?
  2. Do you require the voting data for historical reporting?
  3. Do users need to register when they vote?
  4. Will this system be use only for one voting type throughout the system life cycle or will more voting on different subjects take place?

If all of the answers are NO then your current update method will work just fine. Just ensure that you apply best coding and MySQL table practices anyway.

Let assume most or all your answers were YES then I would suggest the following:

  • Every time a vote takes place INSERT the record into your table
  • Using INSERT, add a timestamp, user id if not possible then maybe an ip address/location
  • Assign a subject id as foreign key from the vote_subject table. In this table store the subject and date of voting
  • Now you can create a SELECT statement that can count the votes and calculate the ratings. The person top of the vote count list will get rating 1 in the SELECT. Furthermore you can filter per subject, per day, per user and you should also be able to determine volume depending on the result required.

All this of course dependent on how your system will scale in future. This might be way overkill but something to think about.

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1. Suppose be user table with a million rows of users. And everyone needs to put in a rating based on the number of votes. That is, from one to a million. 2. No, I need to show the current user rating on the user page. 3. Yes, with registration. 4. One voting type. I must update vote field, when some user vote for current user. I need a table (or a field in the table), which will be issued to each user rating from one to the count of users. And voting for the user (this is very common), it is necessary to offset possible rating and rating by moving up or down relative to other users. –  Kirill Speransky Sep 21 '12 at 17:14
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Yes aggregations are expensive. You could update a rank table every five minutes or so and query from there. The query as you probably already now is this:

select id, count(*) as votes
from users
group by id
order by votes desc
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About upgrading, for example, every minute, I've been thinking. –  Kirill Speransky Sep 21 '12 at 16:51
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Instead of having the fields id, votes and rating, alter the table to have the fields id, rating_sum and rating_count. Each time you have a new rating you quering the database like this:

    "UPDATE `ratings` SET `rating_count` = `rating_count` + 1, `rating_sum` = `rating_sum`+ $user_rating WHERE `id` = $id"

Now the rating is just the average -> rating_sum / rating_count. No need to have a field with the rating.

Also, to prevent a user rate more than one times, you could create a table named rating_users that will have 2 foreign keys the users.id and ratings.id. The primary key will be (users.id, ratings.id). So each time a user tries to rate first you check this table.

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That would be fine if you just wanted to deal with an aggregate rating average, but most rating systems want you to be able to see how individual users rated an item. –  David Grenier Sep 21 '12 at 16:48
    
I do not need an average rating. I need a rating of 1, 2, 3, 4 ... for each user rating is unique and can not be the same as that of another user. Users will appreciate each other. and rating is based on this. –  Kirill Speransky Sep 21 '12 at 16:57
    
You can solve this by adding an extra field in table rating_users that will be the specific user's rating. –  Manolis Agkopian Sep 21 '12 at 16:58
    
But how i can recalculation user rating on each update query(votes field)? –  Kirill Speransky Sep 21 '12 at 17:03
    
Well, you want to know what each user rated and what is the rating, right? For this you need 2 tables: 1) Ratings(id, rating_count, rating_sum) and 2) Ratings_users(user_id, rating_id, user_rated). With each rating you update the Ratings table, like I said before and then Ratings_Users. When you want to know the rating you query the database and take rating_sum / rerating_count, and when you want to know what a user rated you query his id and the id of the rating to the other table to take it. You don't need to do any recalculation beacause you dont store the average in the db at all. –  Manolis Agkopian Sep 21 '12 at 17:15
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I would recommend doing this when querying the data. It would be much simpler. Order by votes descending.

Perhaps create a view and use the view when querying the data.

You could try something like this:

SET @rank := 0

select id, count(*) as votes, @rank := @rank + 1
from users
group by id
order by votes desc

Or

SET @rank := 0

select id, votes, @rank := @rank + 1
from users
order by votes desc
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But if i'm must show current rating for user, how can i do this without rating field? –  Kirill Speransky Sep 21 '12 at 16:44
    
hm.. may do so: SELECT COUNT(*) FROM users WHERE id=$id AND votes>=(votes for this user) ? –  Kirill Speransky Sep 21 '12 at 16:45
    
I agree with this. I think duplicating data in a database always opens you up to potential errors. I would rather do the calculations in the query rather than have an "average rating" field, since all the data you need to calculate the average is already stored. Of course, the biggest disadvantage of doing it this way is it can make your code much harder to read/write. So it's not a hard-and-fast rule. –  David Grenier Sep 21 '12 at 16:50
    
I do not need an average rating. I need a rating of 1, 2, 3, 4 ... for each user rating is unique and can not be the same as that of another user. –  Kirill Speransky Sep 21 '12 at 16:55
    
I updated my answer with the ranking field. –  Tom Sep 21 '12 at 17:04
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