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I would like to discard lines based upon matches in multiple columns. For all matching occurrences in column 1, check the corresponding column 2. Only if all column 2 entries are identical, discard all lines. If even one entry in column 2 is different, then keep all lines.

Example:

Discard the first 3 lines because every column 2 entry is identical for Bob. However, keep the remaining 4 lines because at least one entry in column 2 differs for Jan:

Bob Blue
Bob Blue
Bob Blue
Jan Red
Jan Red
Jan Green
Jan Red
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1  
Is the file sorted on the first column? –  William Pursell Sep 21 '12 at 16:28
2  
What have you tried? –  ghoti Sep 21 '12 at 17:46
1  
what if there is only one row for a particular column value. –  Vijay Sep 21 '12 at 18:07
    
@puresll - yes I can will be presorting by the first column –  user1689311 Sep 23 '12 at 20:29
    
@ghoti - I have not tried anything. I did not know where to start :-( –  user1689311 Sep 23 '12 at 20:30

5 Answers 5

Here's one way using GNU awk. Run like:

awk -f script.awk file.txt{,}

Contents of script.awk:

FNR==NR {
    array[$0]++
    next
}

{
    counter = 0
    for (i in array) {
        split(i, holder, FS)
        if (holder[1] == $1) {
            counter++
        }
    }
    if (counter >= 2) {
        print
    }
}

Results:

Jan Red
Jan Red
Jan Green
Jan Red

Alternatively, here's the one-liner:

awk 'FNR==NR { array[$0]++; next } { counter = 0; for (i in array) { split(i, holder, FS); if (holder[1] == $1) counter++ } if (counter >= 2) print } ' file.txt{,}
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This might work for you (although it is GNU sed):

sed ':a;$!N;/^\(\S*\s\).*\n\1/{s/\n/\x01/;ba};h;x;s/\n.*//;s/^/\x01/;/^\(\x01[^\x01]\+\)\(\1\)\+$/{x;D};s/.//;s/\x01/\n/gp;x;D' file

Explanation:

  • :a loop marker
  • $!N unless it is the last line, append a newline and the next line to the pattern space (PS)
  • /^\S*\s).*\n\1/{s/\n/\x01/;ba} form all lines beginning with the same key into a single line, replacing newlines by the hexcode 01
  • h store the current PS in the hold space (HS)
  • x switch the PS with the HS
  • s/\n.*// delete the last line appended (this is not a match)
  • s/^/\x01/ prepend a hexcode 01 to the start of the HS (this is an imaginary newline for matching purposes.
  • /^\(\x01[^\x01]\+\)\(\1\)\+$/{x;D} for those lines that are all the same i.e have no exceptions, switch the HS with the PS and delete those lines and begin next iteration.
  • s/.//;s/\x01/\n/gp;x;D' those lines that do have exceptions, remove the added hexcode 01 added to the front, replace all other such codes with newlines and print the those lines. Then switch the HS with the PS and delete upto the the first newline and begin next iteration.
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If your input is in a text file named "test.txt" you can get it running:

cat test.txt | grep ^`cat test.txt | sort -u | awk 'BEGIN{split("", aux, "");ok="";} {if ($1 in aux){if (length(ok) > 0){ok=ok"\|"$1;}else{ok=$1;}}aux[$1]="";} END{print ok;}' -`

You can execute step by step to understand the commands, or you can ask me (the AWK part is a little bit complicated).

This way, the output is:

Jan Red
Jan Red
Jan Green
Jan Red

Edit: I forgot to add the backslash to the "|" grep's OR ;-)

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three simple steps:

sort -u temp | nawk '{a[$1]++}END{for(i in a)print i,a[i]}' > temp_file
nawk 'FNR==NR{a[$1]=$2;next}{if(($1 in a) && a[$1]>1)print $0}' temp_file your_file
rm -rf tempfile

You can incorporate these steps in a shell script and then execute it

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KEY_STRINGS="`sort file | uniq | awk '{print$1}' | uniq -d`" 
awk -vkeys="$KEY_STRINGS" '{if(keys~/$1/)print$0}' file

I believe this script will be more easier to understand.

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