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Is the below function definition is legal or not?

T& GetMax(const T& t1, const T& t2)
{
    if (t1 > t2)
    {
        return t2;
    }
    // else 
    return t2;
}

It is written that : "At the return statements, compiler would complain that t1 or t2 cannot be converted to non-const." I read it in this site : http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/257589/An-Idiots-Guide-to-Cplusplus-Templates-Part-1

Does it mean that it is illegal ,if not what else? Could you provide example of use of it? Could you provide some clear explanation to me ? Thanks in advance

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1  
So, you mean that you want to return t1 or t2? Have you tried to implement it and compile it? What is the error that you are seeing? –  Mihai Todor Sep 21 '12 at 16:58
    
Is the below function definition is legal or not? It depends on what you're doing within the function. It is written that ... It is written where? Some context would be nice. –  Praetorian Sep 21 '12 at 16:59
3  
"Is the below function definition is legal or not?" No, it has too many dots in it. Seriously, if the compiler complains about the return statement, show us the return statement. See SSCCE.ORG for more guidelines. –  Robᵩ Sep 21 '12 at 17:00
    
I also think that it is legal . But I read it in the url which i said . The author of the article doesn't mention about the function of the body . He doesn't say whether the function returns t1 or t2 or another thing . He only says that "At the return statements, compiler would complain that t1 or t2 cannot be converted to non-const." Thus i am confused. –  oiyio Sep 21 '12 at 17:04
1  
@user1308990 Have you actually READ the article? I Quote: "You should have noticed, I have not added const to any of two parameters passed. This is required; since function returns non-const reference of type T" –  Mihai Todor Sep 21 '12 at 17:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why should it be illegal? Your function can use some global state to return, while it is forbidden to return its arguments.

int& foo(const int& a, const int& b)
{
    static int c = a + b;
    return c;
}

ADDED

You cannot return one of your argument, because it will violate const constrains. You can

  • return from function by value
  • use non-const argument types

if returning non-const in your case would be possible, one could write

foo(5, 4) = 3;

which has no sense.

You can not also return reference to some temporary automatic variable, created inside function, as it will be destroyed, when function finished.

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Added the body of the function to the question –  Mooing Duck Sep 21 '12 at 17:09
    
This is a good idea how to introduce a bug into your code. I don't think that the function works as intended, though legal. Call it two times with different arguments and assign results to two different variables. I don't get why this is up-voted and the answer suggesting avoiding such constructions got down-voted. –  luk32 Sep 21 '12 at 17:44
    
@luk32, it is just illustration of possibility. The minimal example. All operator= member functions accept constant references and return non-constant references, for example. While downvoted question suggest one return refrence to local, which is actually bas advice. –  Lol4t0 Sep 21 '12 at 17:57
    
@lol well i see the question changed a bit. Still, as I stated, it is legal. OK. But coming up with good example is not easy. In my opinion yours suggest you can write a function instantiate a variable in it and return as a reference. int x=foo(1,2); int y=foo(2,3); won't produce x=2 and y=5. And I was not talking about down-voted question I was talking about answer by @Lukos which I find perfecly fine. Returning reference to a local variable is always a bad idea. static does not help that much. In fact int c = a + b; would also compile. ` –  luk32 Sep 21 '12 at 18:11
    
@luk32, Lukos states: 'If you must use your format, you would have to create a local clone of one of the inputs and return that instead'. Isn't it returning reference to a local variable? Also second advise of using pointer not seem to be good also. –  Lol4t0 Sep 21 '12 at 18:30

The definition is fine. The function can return a reference to some other variable than t1 or t2. The compiler would only complain if you tried to return t1 or t2.

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Added the body of the function to the question –  Mooing Duck Sep 21 '12 at 17:09

It is illegal and the compiler would give an error message.

The reason is the function returns a const which is in contrast to its definition for the return value; i.e. because the return value has not been defined as const. However, it is not the signature that is problematic; the problem is in return statements and this is why the compiler gives error at return statements.

if you change it in this way:

const T& GetMax(const T& t1, const T& t2)
{
    if (t1 > t2)
    {
        return t2;
    }
    // else 
    return t2;
}

the code will be compiled with no errors. However, if outside of this function somewhere else you do:

GetMax(x,y) = 0;

the compiler would fail at this line because you are assigning value to a const (= the return value of the function).

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It is legal but not recommended to return references since the reference would usually be to a local variable. You would normally return a pointer to an object you have 'new'd but then the caller would have to delete that item. If you must use your format, you would have to create a local clone of one of the inputs and return that instead.

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