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I want to use one pointer ( _ref ) to point to different class types. In order to use it, I must cast it to the type that is addressed. I cannot do that because of the incomplete type that is at line 5. If i move the definition of B to line 5, it requires class A to be defined.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

class B;

class A{
    void *_ref;
    std::string _reft;
public:
    void setref(A &a){
        _ref=&a;
        _reft=typeid(a).name();
    }
    void setref(B &b){
        _ref=&b;
        _reft=typeid(b).name();
    }
    void test(){
        if(_ref && _reft==std::string(typeid(B).name())){
            std::cout<<"Ref to B: ";
            static_cast<B*>(_ref)->test(); //error here
        }
    }
};

class B{
    std::vector<A> a;
public:
    A A(int i){
        return a[i];
    }
    void test(){
        std::cout<<"IT WORKS!";
    }
};

int main(){
    A a;
    B b;
    a.setref(b);
    a.test();
    return 0;
}
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Why are you using a void * for ref? Why not use inheritance? –  Ed Heal Sep 21 '12 at 17:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Move the implementation of the function that requires B to be complete out of the class; put it either in a source file, or inline after the definition of B:

class A{
    // ...
    void test();
};

class B{
    // ...
};

inline void A::test(){
    // ...
}
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This should be done even without this problem. Defining everything in the class body is bad style. –  Dirk Holsopple Sep 21 '12 at 17:58
    
@DirkHolsopple: That's a matter of personal taste. Your taste isn't a universal definition of good style. –  Mike Seymour Sep 21 '12 at 17:58
    
@MikeSeymour: Thanks a lot! @ DirkHolsopple: this was just an example, but in the program I'm working on is written only the declaration of the class. –  Adrian Munteanu Sep 21 '12 at 18:05
    
@MikeSeymour: It's not simply a matter of style. The more junk you throw into a header the longer it takes to compile. There are also cases which require circular object relationships, which are impossible unless you split the code out. You should always split out your definitions when possible. –  Ed S. Sep 21 '12 at 18:05
    
@EdS.: And the more junk you throw in separate source files, the less the compiler is able to optimise it. There are pros and cons to both approaches; neither can be described as "bad style", even if you personally prefer one to the other. (Although, obviously you have to split them out when you have to). –  Mike Seymour Sep 21 '12 at 18:11

If you use pointers rather than references you will be able to do this.

You need to change your function definitions to use pointers not references.

Then when calling the functions use the address of the object.

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2  
There's no difference between pointers and references, as far as needing a complete type is concerned. The problem is the call to B::test(), which needs a complete type. –  Mike Seymour Sep 21 '12 at 17:55
    
<tired laugh> I have spent way too much time with old source code. –  Richard Chambers Sep 21 '12 at 18:20

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