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Does anyone know a query for listing out all foreign keys in a database with "WITH NOCHECK" description applied to it? (removing them will boost performance and stability).

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1  
What version of SQL Server? –  Nick Kavadias Aug 10 '09 at 8:42
    
SQL Server 2005 –  digiguru Aug 10 '09 at 8:50
    
Guys, I need this same thing, but sql 2000 compatible! –  boomhauer May 19 '10 at 22:48
    
you should change the answer on this question to YOURS (is_not_trusted=1) –  Brad Oct 29 '10 at 19:53
    
I have removed a dead link from the question. Perhaps this sqlblog.com/blogs/tibor_karaszi/archive/2008/01/12/… offers the same information? –  user806549 Nov 13 '12 at 8:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The following will return the name of the foreign keys in the current database that are disabled i.e. WITH NOCHECK

For SQL Server 2005/2008:

select * from sys.foreign_keys where is_disabled=1




There was some discussion in the answer about the difference between disabled & not trusted. What's below explains the differnce Here's some code to clarify the difference between is_disabled & isnotrusted.

-- drop table t1
-- drop table t2
create table t1(i int not null, fk int not null)
create table t2(i int not null)
-- create primary key on t2
alter table t2
add constraint pk_1 primary key (i)
-- create foriegn key on t1
alter table t1
add constraint fk_1 foreign key (fk)
    references t2 (i)
--insert some records
insert t2 values(100)
insert t2 values(200)
insert t2 values(300)
insert t2 values(400)
insert t2 values(500)
insert t1 values(1,100)
insert t1 values(2,100)
insert t1 values(3,500)
insert t1 values(4,500)
----------------------------
-- 1. enabled and trusted
select name,is_disabled,is_not_trusted from sys.foreign_keys
GO

-- 2. disable the constraint
alter table t1 NOCHECK CONSTRAINT fk_1
select name,is_disabled,is_not_trusted from sys.foreign_keys
GO

-- 3. re-enable constraint, data isnt checked, so not trusted.
-- this means the optimizer will still have to check the column
alter table  t1 CHECK CONSTRAINT fk_1 
select name,is_disabled,is_not_trusted from sys.foreign_keys
GO

--4. drop the foreign key constraint & re-add 
-- it making sure its checked
-- constraint is then enabled and trusted
alter table t1  DROP CONSTRAINT fk_1
alter table t1 WITH CHECK 
add constraint fk_1 foreign key (fk)
    references t2 (i)
select name,is_disabled,is_not_trusted from sys.foreign_keys
GO


--5. drop the foreign key constraint & add but dont check
-- constraint is then enabled, but not trusted
alter table t1  DROP CONSTRAINT fk_1
alter table t1 WITH NOCHECK 
add constraint fk_1 foreign key (fk)
    references t2 (i)
select name,is_disabled,is_not_trusted from sys.foreign_keys
GO

is_disabled means the constraint is disabled

isnottrusted means that SQL Server does not trust that the column has been checked against the foreign key table.

Thus it cannot be assumed that re-enabling the foreign key constraint will be optimized. To ensure the optimizer trusts the column, it's best to drop the foreign key constraint & re-create it with the WITH CHECK option (4.)

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Sorry, I've only just read this answer. It's truly great! –  digiguru Feb 1 '11 at 15:53
5  
You can re-enable the constraint and have it checked at the same time with the following code: ALTER TABLE t1 WITH CHECK CHECK CONSTRAINT fk_1 This is a bit simpler than dropping and re-creating the constraint. –  Aaron Sep 12 '12 at 19:40

WITH NOCHECK should only ever be applied to FK's temporarily, or they become useless to the optimiser as your linked article points out. From BOL:

The query optimizer does not consider constraints that are defined WITH NOCHECK. Such constraints are ignored until they are re-enabled by using ALTER TABLE table CHECK CONSTRAINT ALL.

This will identify all your Foreign Keys: (working on the WITH NOCHECK bit...)

SELECT C.TABLE_CATALOG [PKTABLE_QUALIFIER], 
       C.TABLE_SCHEMA [PKTABLE_OWNER], 
       C.TABLE_NAME [PKTABLE_NAME], 
       KCU.COLUMN_NAME [PKCOLUMN_NAME], 
       C2.TABLE_CATALOG [FKTABLE_QUALIFIER], 
       C2.TABLE_SCHEMA [FKTABLE_OWNER], 
       C2.TABLE_NAME [FKTABLE_NAME], 
       KCU2.COLUMN_NAME [FKCOLUMN_NAME], 
       RC.UPDATE_RULE, 
       RC.DELETE_RULE, 
       C.CONSTRAINT_NAME [FK_NAME], 
       C2.CONSTRAINT_NAME [PK_NAME], 
       CAST(7 AS SMALLINT) [DEFERRABILITY] 
FROM   INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS C 
       INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE KCU 
         ON C.CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA = KCU.CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA 
            AND C.CONSTRAINT_NAME = KCU.CONSTRAINT_NAME 
       INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.REFERENTIAL_CONSTRAINTS RC 
         ON C.CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA = RC.CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA 
            AND C.CONSTRAINT_NAME = RC.CONSTRAINT_NAME 
       INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLE_CONSTRAINTS C2 
         ON RC.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA = C2.CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA 
            AND RC.UNIQUE_CONSTRAINT_NAME = C2.CONSTRAINT_NAME 
       INNER JOIN INFORMATION_SCHEMA.KEY_COLUMN_USAGE KCU2 
         ON C2.CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA = KCU2.CONSTRAINT_SCHEMA 
            AND C2.CONSTRAINT_NAME = KCU2.CONSTRAINT_NAME 
            AND KCU.ORDINAL_POSITION = KCU2.ORDINAL_POSITION 
WHERE  C.CONSTRAINT_TYPE = 'FOREIGN KEY'

Ref.

As an aside, in both SQL Server 2000 and 2005, you can check if any data violates a constraint using:

DBCC CHECKCONSTRAINTS (table_name)
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DBCC CHECKCONSTRAINTS is useful, but this really doesn't answer the question. –  digiguru Aug 10 '09 at 9:27
SELECT * FROM sys.foreign_keys AS f Where Is_Not_Trusted = 1
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1  
The is_not_trusted column means that sql server has not checked the values to ensure FK integrity. i.e. If the constraint has ever had a NOCHECK applied! this is quite clever & in fact what the optimizer will use to figure out if it can trust the integrity on the column. So what you need to do is no just re-enable the constraint, but re-check the column –  Nick Kavadias Aug 10 '09 at 9:59
    
But it wasn't "disabled". How would you suggest performing "re-enabling" it? –  digiguru Aug 10 '09 at 10:24
    
+1: digiguru, msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189807.aspx You can re-check the key like this: ALTER TABLE [schema].[table] CHECK CONSTRAINT [FK_myConstraint] –  Brad Oct 29 '10 at 19:57

The following code retrieves all foreign keys that are marked 'WITH NOCHECK' and then uses an ALTER statement to fix them up:

-- configure cursor on all FKs with "WITH NOCHECK"
DECLARE UntrustedForeignKeysCursor CURSOR STATIC FOR
    SELECT  f.name,
            t.name 
    FROM    sys.foreign_keys AS f
            LEFT JOIN sys.tables AS t 
                ON f.parent_object_id = t.object_id 
    Where   Is_Not_Trusted = 1
OPEN UntrustedForeignKeysCursor

-- loop through the untrusted FKs
DECLARE @FKName varchar(100)
DECLARE @TableName varchar(100)
FETCH NEXT FROM UntrustedForeignKeysCursor INTO @FKName, @TableName
WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN

    -- Rebuild the FK constraint WITH CHECK
    EXEC ('ALTER TABLE ' + @TableName + ' WITH CHECK CHECK CONSTRAINT ' + @FKName)

    -- get next user
    FETCH NEXT FROM UntrustedForeignKeysCursor INTO @FKName, @TableName

END

-- cleanup
CLOSE UntrustedForeignKeysCursor
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The following script will generate the alter statements that will both check existing data and prevent any new violations for foreign keys that are not currently trusted ('with nocheck').

Execute it in SQL Server Management Studio to generate the scripts and then copy them into a query window to execute them.

select
    'alter table ' + quotename(s.name) + '.' + quotename(t.name) + ' with check check constraint ' + fk.name +';'
from 
    sys.foreign_keys fk
inner join
    sys.tables t
on
    fk.parent_object_id = t.object_id
inner join
    sys.schemas s
on
    t.schema_id = s.schema_id
where 
    fk.is_not_trusted = 1
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