Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Really simple question, but can't figure this out. Why does y compute to 2 in the (Java) code below?

int x = 2;
int y = 2;
switch (x * 2) {
    case 4: y += 1;
    case 6: y -= 2;
    default: y += 1;
}
share|improve this question
    
Is this your homework? (meta.stackexchange.com/questions/18242/…) –  Javier Sep 21 '12 at 18:59

4 Answers 4

It falls through from case 4 to case 6 to the default, so it increments (new value: 3), decrements by 2 (new value: 1) and then increments (new value: 2).

The compiler should have warned you about the fall-through, at least if you use -Xlint. Never ignore compiler warnings out of hand, and always compile with -Xlint :)

share|improve this answer

You forgot to add break:

int x = 2;
int y = 2;
switch (x * 2) {
    case 4: 
        y += 1;
        break;
    case 6:
        y -= 2;
        break;
    default: y += 1;
}
share|improve this answer

You did not add break after case. So it execute all statement. y=y+1-2+1; 2

Switch statement should be -

int x = 2;
int y = 2;
switch (x * 2) {
    case 4: y += 1;break;
    case 6: y -= 2;break;
    default: y += 1;
}

Then y would be 3

share|improve this answer

In a switch statement all cases below the first matching case will be executed unless you add a break; statement.

If you expect y to be 1 you need to do:

int x = 2; 
int y = 2;  
switch (x * 2){  
case 4: y += 1; 
break;
case 6: y -= 2; 
break;
default: y += 1; 
} 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.