Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two big files with a lot of text, and what I have to do is keep all lines in file A that have a field that matches a field in file B.

file A is something like:

Name (tab)  #  (tab)  #  (tab)  KEYFIELD  (tab)  Other fields

file B I managed to use cut and sed and other things to basically get it down to one field that is a list.

So The goal is to keep all lines in file A in the 4th field (it says KEYFIELD) if the field for that line matches one of the lines in file B. (Does NOT have to be an exact match, so if file B had Blah and file A said Blah_blah, it'd be ok)

I tried to do:

grep -f fileBcutdown fileA > outputfile

EDIT: Ok I give up. I just force killed it.

Is there a better way to do this? File A is 13.7MB and file B after cutting it down is 32.6MB for anyone that cares.

EDIT: This is an example line in file A:

chr21 33025905 33031813 ENST00000449339.1 0 - 33031813 33031813 0 3 1835,294,104, 0,4341,5804,

example line from file B cut down:

ENST00000111111
share|improve this question
    
In your first sentence you say that the files are over 400 MB in size, yet in your last sentence, they are only ~50 MB. What's the contents of outputfile after the 45 minutes? Btw, the CPU won't be the bottleneck here, but slow/fast harddrives can make a big difference. –  knittl Sep 21 '12 at 19:24
    
Ah I should've been clearer. File B before cutting it down was 400MB+. After I threw out all the stuff I didn't need it was 32.6MB. This is just a 7200rpm drive, and the outputfile is... empty when I do less outputfile. Crap. Edited the original post to make it clearer. –  Joe Sep 21 '12 at 19:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's one way using GNU awk. Run like:

awk -f script.awk fileB.txt fileA.txt

Contents of script.awk:

FNR==NR {
    array[$0]++
    next
}

{
    line = $4
    sub(/\.[0-9]+$/, "", line)
    if (line in array) {
        print
    }
}

Alternatively, here's the one-liner:

awk 'FNR==NR { array[$0]++; next } { line = $4; sub(/\.[0-9]+$/, "", line); if (line in array) print }' fileB.txt fileA.txt

GNU awk can also perform the pre-processing of fileB.txt that you described using cut and sed. If you would like me to build this into the above script, you will need to provide an example of what this line looks like.


UPDATE using files HumanGenCodeV12 and GenBasicV12:

Run like:

awk -f script.awk HumanGenCodeV12 GenBasicV12 > output.txt

Contents of script.awk:

FNR==NR {
    gsub(/[^[:alnum:]]/,"",$12)
    array[$12]++
    next
}

{
    line = $4
    sub(/\.[0-9]+$/, "", line)
    if (line in array) {
        print
    }
}

This successfully prints lines in GenBasicV12 that can be found in HumanGenCodeV12. The output file (output.txt) contains 65340 lines. The script takes less than 10 seconds to complete.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi there, thanks for the answer. File B has already been processed into another file, so I won't need that. I'll give your script a try right now and see what happens. –  Joe Sep 23 '12 at 20:03
    
@Joe: So how did it go? –  Steve Sep 23 '12 at 22:40
    
Hmm, it did work... sort of. This gave me an output file of 2.1MB, whereas another script I found and wrote up gave me an output file of 11MB (!!!). I'm still trying to figure out the difference. –  Joe Sep 25 '12 at 1:39
    
Hmm, so it turned out that this script stopped about 1/5 to 1/4 of the way through instead of going all the way. That's weird. EDIT: That was for the one-liner script. It seems like the other one returned... nothing. Huh. –  Joe Sep 25 '12 at 1:47
    
@Joe: It sounds like you have a few inconsistencies with your data. The script and the one-liner above should output exactly the same results. Would you be able to send me either more example data or your complete files (preferably before any processing)? I would recommend something like dropbox or mediafire. –  Steve Sep 25 '12 at 2:38

You're hitting the limit of using the basic shell tools. Assuming about 40 characters per line, File A has 400,000 lines in it and File B has about 1,200,000 lines in it. You're basically running grep for each line in File A and having grep plow through 1,200,000 lines with each execution. that's 480 BILLION lines you're parsing through. Unix tools are surprisingly quick, but even something fast done 480 billion times will add up.

You would be better off using a full programming scripting language like Perl or Python. You put all lines in File B in a hash. You take each line in File A, check to see if that fourth field matches something in the hash.

Reading in a few hundred thousand lines? Creating a 10,000,000 entry hash? Perl can parse both of those in a matter of minutes.

Something -- off the top of my head. You didn't give us much in the way of spects, so I didn't do any testing:

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;
use feature qw(say);

# Create your index
open my $file_b, "<", "file_b.txt";
my %index;

while (my $line = <$file_b>) {
    chomp $line;
    $index{$line} = $line;    #Or however you do it...
}
close $file_b;


#
# Now check against file_a.txt
#

open my $file_a, "<", "file_a.txt";
while (my $line = <$file_a>) {
    chomp $line;
    my @fields = split /\s+/, $line;
    if (exists $index{$field[3]}) {
         say "Line: $line";
    }
}
close $file_a;

The hash means you only have to read through file_b once instead of 400,000 times. Start the program, go grab a cup of coffee from the office kitchen. (Yum! non-dairy creamer!) By the time you get back to your desk, it'll be done.

share|improve this answer
    
I haven't really done much with perl or python before so... yeah. I'll give your script a try, nevertheless. Thanks for the help! I edited the OP so I include what both files look like. –  Joe Sep 21 '12 at 20:22
    
Wait. I just noticed this thing doesn't actually output anything. What would I have to add on to your script to have it output stuff from file A that passes through? Sorry, don't know perl at all. –  Joe Sep 21 '12 at 20:56
    
This doesn't satisfy the OP's requirement that the match "does NOT have to be an exact match, so if file B had Blah and file A said Blah_blah, it'd be ok". –  ruakh Sep 22 '12 at 5:00
    
@joe The say statement is new to Perl. It's like a print statement that automatically prints a \n at the end. –  David W. Sep 24 '12 at 13:11
    
@ruakh - I figured the "not exact" requirement was more due to the use of grep instead of the initial requirements. There's no real definition of how close it has to be. The main point I was making is that grep is slow in this case because of the algorithm it require: Time increases as a product of the number of lines in both files. BASH shell is powerful, but does have its limits. There are times to break out a real scripting language and this is one. –  David W. Sep 24 '12 at 13:19

grep -f seems to be very slow even for medium sized pattern files (< 1MB). I guess it tries every pattern for each line in the input stream.

A solution, which was faster for me, was to use a while loop. This assumes that fileA is reasonably small (it is the smaller one in your example), so iterating multiple times over the smaller file is preferable over iterating the larger file multiple times.

while read line; do
  grep -F "$line" fileA
done < fileBcutdown > outputfile

Note that this loop will output a line several times if it matches multiple patterns. To work around this limitation use sort -u, but this might be slower by quite a bit. You have to try.

while read line; do
  grep -F "$line" fileA
done < fileBcutdown | sort -u | outputfile

If you depend on the order of the lines, then I don't think you have any other option than using grep -f. But basically it boils down to trying m*n pattern matches.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm… forget it. It's what I wrote in my last sentence, you need to run m*n matching operations. Maybe you're better off loading the patterns into memory all at once and then iterate over fileA and skip all remaining patterns when finding the first match (using a better language than shellscript) –  knittl Sep 21 '12 at 20:02
    
Ok thanks for the help. FileB after cutting it down I did sort it using sort. Grep -f is still running and outputfile is STILL empty though. Ugh. I'll give your solution a try in a second. –  Joe Sep 21 '12 at 20:07

use the below command:

awk 'FNR==NR{a[$0];next}($4 in a)' <your filtered fileB with single field> fileA
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.