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In the following code, I pass a struct into a constructor that is expecting a class. Why does this compile and run without error (and produce the desired output)?

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        var entity = new Foo { Id = 3 };
        var t = new Test<IEntity>(entity); // why doesn't this fail?
        Console.WriteLine(t.Entity.Id.ToString());
        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

public class Test<TEntity> where TEntity : class
{
    public TEntity Entity { get; set; }

    public Test(TEntity entity)
    {
        Entity = entity;
    }

    public void ClearEntity()
    {
        Entity = null;
    }
}

public struct Foo : IEntity
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
}

public interface IEntity
{
    int Id { get; set; }
}

If I change my Main() method so that it includes a call to ClearEntity(), as shown below, it still generates no error. Why?

static void Main()
{
    var entity = new Foo { Id = 3 };
    var t = new Test<IEntity>(entity);
    Console.WriteLine(t.Entity.Id.ToString());
    t.ClearEntity(); // why doesn't this fail?
    Console.ReadKey();
}
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5  
Foo being IEntity, it will be boxed. The boxed instance is an instance of a class. –  Humberto Sep 21 '12 at 20:00
    
How can he compile t.Entity.Id when Entity is defined as type TEntity where TEntity : class, which doesn't implement IEntity? –  Matt Klein Sep 21 '12 at 20:03
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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

where TEntity : class forces TEntity to be a reference type, but an interface such as IEntity is a reference type.

See here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/d5x73970(v=vs.80).aspx

where T : class | The type argument must be a reference type, including any class, interface, delegate, or array type

Regarding your second question, you might think t.ClearEntity() would fail because it's assigning null to a variable whose type is a value type, but that's not the case. The compile-time type of Entity is the reference type IEntity, and the runtime type (after assignment) is the null type. So you never have a variable of type Foo but value null.

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+1. Good explanation, thanks. This opens up some nice possibilities I didn't realize were available. –  devuxer Sep 21 '12 at 20:08
1  
Thanks, I added a little more about why ClearEntity doesn't fail. I thought it was worth noting that the runtime type stored in Entity is changed by assigning null to it. –  Tim Goodman Sep 21 '12 at 20:19
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from the C# documentation:

where T : class

The type argument must be a reference type, including any class, interface, delegate, or array type. (See note below.)

Because you're passing the struct via an interface, it's still considered a reference type.

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Because it's being boxed it actually is a reference type, it's not like it's a value type that just isn't being filtered by the class restriction. –  Servy Sep 21 '12 at 20:04
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Within the .net runtime, every non-nullable value type has an associated reference type (often referred to as a "boxed value type") which derives from System.ValueType. Saying Object Foo = 5; won't actually store an Int32 into Foo; instead it will create a new instance of the reference type associated with Int32 and store a reference to that instance. A class constraint on a generic type specifies that the type in question must be some sort of a reference type, but does not by itself exclude the possibility that the type may be used to pass a reference to a boxed value-type instance. In most contexts outside generic type constraints, interface types are regarded as class types.

It's important to note that not only are boxed value types stored like reference types; they behave like reference types. For example, List<string>.Enumerator is a value type which implements IEnumerator<string>. If one has two variables of type List<string>.Enumerator, copying one to the other will copy the state of the enumeration, such that there will be two separate and independent enumerators which point to the same list. Copying one of those variables to a variable of type IEnumerator<string> will create a new instance of the boxed value type associated with List<string.Enumerator and store in the latter variable a reference to that new object (which will be a third independent enumerator). Copying that variable to another of type IEnumerator<string>, however, will simply store a reference to the existing object (since IEnumerator<string> is a reference type).

The C# language tries to pretend that value types derive from Object, but within the guts of the .net Runtime they really don't. Instead, they're convertible to types which derive from System.ValueType (which in turn derives from Object). The latter types will satisfy a type constraint, even though the former ones will not. Incidentally, despite its name, System.ValueType is actually a class type.

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I, likewise, assumed that constraint keyword class meant the same class as the type declaration keyword class, but it doesn't.

As explained in the other answers, the term class here is over-loaded, which seems to me to be a horrible decision for the C# language design. Something like referencetype would have been more helpful.

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A more fundamental problem is the fiction that value-type storage locations hold things that derive from Object. Boxed value types derive from Object, but value-type storage locations don't hold those. Fundamentally, a class constraint on T implies two things about e.g. T foo;: (1) the default value of foo will be a null reference; (2) foo.bar() will invoke the bar() method act upon a T to which foo holds a reference, without giving that method any access to foo itself. Those things are no less true of boxed value types than of any other class type. –  supercat Oct 21 '13 at 17:21
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