Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having a problem understanding Java generics and I've simplified to this example

class A<T extends B> {

    public void fun(T t) {

    }
}

class B {
    A a;

    public void event() {
    	a.fun(this);
    }

}

The problem is that this generates a warning because A is defined inside B but A is already using it as a generic type.

My first instinct would be that my design is wrong, but in this case I can't change it. A is like a collection and B is like a node in the collection that users are supposed to override. Certain events can happen in B that require reporting back to the parent A.

But since A is defined generically with B, how do I avoid the compile warning inside B.event()

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
The only warning I can see is the use of A as a raw type. If that isn't the warning you're referring to, please be more specific, and tell us which compiler you're using. –  skaffman Aug 10 '09 at 8:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Code

public class A<T extends B> {
    public void fun(T t) {
    }
}

public class B {
    A<B> a;

    public void event() {
        a.fun(this);
    }
}

The warning is vanquished.

Reason

Variables of type A should be declared using a specific class type, as suggested by the generic class signature (A<T extends B>).

Resolution

While this resolves the compiler warning, the underlying problem remains. Laurence provides an excellent explanation and solution to the core issue.

share|improve this answer

The problem is that you're using a raw type on this line:

A a;

You need to specify a type for A's type parameter (T).

You could do something like this:

A<B> a;

but then A might as well not be generic at all, if I'm understanding your statement of the problem. You probably want to do something like this:

class A<T> {
  public void fun(T t) {

  }
}

class B<T extends B<T>> {
  A<B<T>> a;
  public void event() {
    a.fun(this);
  }
}

or even this:

class A<T extends B<? extends T>> {
  public void fun(T t) {

  }
}

class B<T extends B<T>> {
  A<? super B<T>> a;
  public void event() {
    a.fun(this);
  }
}

There are a couple of variations in-between these that are possibly useful as well. The latter example is the most generic (but obviously, also the most complicated).

The class A<T extends B<? extends T>> is ensuring that the type parameter to A is a B. Since B is itself generic, and has that cyclic type parameter, you end up needing to say B<? extends T> (simply saying T won't work here).

The class B<T extends B<T>> is as close as you can get to emulating a "self type" in Java. This lets B talk about the (almost) concrete subtype of itself. When subclassing B you'd say something like "class C extends <B<C>>". This is useful because now the type of C.a is actually A<? super B<C>>.

The ? super bit in the latter example is only useful if you plan on connecting a B with an A that isn't for exactly the same type of B. Thinking in concrete terms, suppose you had an A<Shape> and a Circle (which extends Shape which extends B). The super-wildcard lets you use them together. Without it you'd need an A<Circle> rather than an A<Shape> for your Circle.

share|improve this answer
    
This is correct, and a great example of wildcards. –  Dave Jarvis Aug 10 '09 at 15:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.