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Here's my try at some basic C# programming. The program is meant to ask the user for a size of an array, then to fill the array, print out the array and finally find the average of the numbers they used to fill the array. The program currently doesn't compile. This is my first time doing this without any sort of reference book so can someone help explain to me what I'm missing? Thanks. EDIT: All of the program works except the part about finding the average of the numbers in the array. Also, if there are any silly mistakes that aren't prudent for production-level coding please let me know.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace _9_21_Test
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("enter the amount of numbers you would like to find the average of: ");
            int arraylength = Int32.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
            int[] AverageArray = new int[arraylength];

            //filling the array with user input
            for (int i = 0; i < AverageArray.Length; i++)
            {
                Console.Write("enter the numbers you wish to find the average for: ");
                AverageArray[i] = Int32.Parse(Console.ReadLine());

            }
            //printing out the array 
            Console.WriteLine("here is your array: ");
            for(int i=0; i < AverageArray.Length; i++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(AverageArray[i]);
            }
            Console.WriteLine(FindAverage);
        }

    }
    //Method to find the average is another class for learning porpoises
    class Calcs
    {
        public static double FindAverage(int[] averageNumbers);
        int arraySum=0;

        for(int i =0; i < averageNumbers.Length; int i++)
            arraysum+=arraysum;

       return double average = arraysum/averageNumbers.Length;


    }

}
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What version of the .Net framework are you using? –  m-y Sep 21 '12 at 20:22
    
using Visual Studio 2010, 4.0 –  wootscootinboogie Sep 21 '12 at 20:23

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change

Console.WriteLine(FindAverage); 

to

Console.WriteLine(Calcs.FindAverage(AverageArray)); 

and

class Calcs 
{ 
    public static double FindAverage(int[] averageNumbers); 
    int arraySum=0; 

    for(int i =0; i < averageNumbers.Length; int i++) 
        arraysum+=arraysum; 

   return double average = arraysum/averageNumbers.Length; 


} 

to

class Calcs 
{ 
    public static double FindAverage(int[] averageNumbers)
    {
        int arraySum=0; 

        for(int i =0; i < averageNumbers.Length; i++) 
            arraySum+=averageNumbers[i]; 

        return arraySum/averageNumbers.Length; 
    } 
}

If you wish to discuss the concepts, we will be more than willing to help.

share|improve this answer
    
this is close to what I wanted to do, but the compiler is telling me that arraysum doesn't exist in this context. I declared it outside of the for loop for that reason, too. –  wootscootinboogie Sep 21 '12 at 20:29
1  
You have to remeber that c# is case sensitive. So arraySum and arraysum is not the same thing. –  astander Sep 21 '12 at 20:30
    
One last thing.. this is my attempt to print out to the screen and i'm not seeing anything in the console. Console.WriteLine(Calcs.FindAverage(AverageArray)); I can't figure out what's up with it. –  wootscootinboogie Sep 21 '12 at 20:33
    
add one more Console.ReadLine(); after Console.WriteLine(Calcs.FindAverage(AverageArray)); to block the application from exiting. –  astander Sep 21 '12 at 20:38
    
Now again, if you wish to discuss the functionalities of c#/.net, the people here will be more than helpfull. –  astander Sep 21 '12 at 20:43

There are a couple of errors here:

Your for loop shouldn't specify "int" twice, and should add in the appropriate number:

// for(int i =0; i < averageNumbers.Length; int i++)
// Remove the extra "int", and 
for(int i =0; i < averageNumbers.Length; i++)
{
      // Add in averageNumbers[i], not arraysum
      arraysum += averageNumbers[i];
}

You also need to remove the semi-colon in Calcs.FindAverage, and make it a method wrapped in braces:

class Calcs
{
    public static double FindAverage(int[] averageNumbers)
    { // Add brace...

        return //...
    } // Close brace
}

Your return statement doesn't need the variable declaration:

// return double average = arraysum/averageNumbers.Length;
// Just return the value
return arraysum/averageNumbers.Length;

Also, when you call FindAverage, you need to actually call the method, ie:

    Console.WriteLine(Calc.FindAverage(AverageArray));

Note that, normally, using .NET 4, you could just use existing functionality. Instead of writing your own method, you can write:

    Console.WriteLine(AverageArray.Average());

This is using Enumerable.Average, which is an extension method that works on any numeric IEnumerable<T>, such as IEnumerable<int> (your array).


Note that, when you compile this inside of Visual Studio, the errors window will list out the errors in your code, with descriptions. You can double click on each error, and it will take you directly to the line causing the error. That should make it fairly straightforward to figure out how to fix your code, one error at a time.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, when you are using Console.WriteLine(FindAverage), you need to use the class name before the static method, and actually call the method, like so: Console.WriteLine(Calc.FindAverage()); –  Dave Zych Sep 21 '12 at 20:24
    
@DaveZych Yeah - caught (and updated) that one just before you put it in there. ;) –  Reed Copsey Sep 21 '12 at 20:24

If you are using the .NET 3.5+ framework then you should use the LINQ extension method Enumerable.Average(IEnumerable<Int32>) instead of reinventing the functionality :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. This is the kind of thing that I need to know (not reinventing the wheel, that is). –  wootscootinboogie Sep 21 '12 at 20:25
1  
I'd disagree. If OP is learning about C# and .NET in general then he/she should stick to the basics of the language before getting into Linq. –  kprobst Sep 21 '12 at 20:26
1  
This is my dilemma. I know that I shouldn't reinvent the wheel, but I want to make it round enough to roll firstly. –  wootscootinboogie Sep 21 '12 at 20:27
    
@kprobst: And I disagree with you. Unless the OP is learning logic itself, then it's best to learn C#/.NET appropriately. It's unreasonable to expect someone new to know every feature out of the box, but when they are presented with the more appropriate solution it should be considered. Also, take into context that LINQ is not that complicated, especially making a simple call to the Average function?? –  m-y Sep 21 '12 at 20:34
1  
@wootscootinboogie Learning is not reinventing the wheel, it's understanding how it works. Start from the beginning and work your way up from there. With Linq you can do this: double avg = values.Average() and get it over with, but you didn't learn anything in the process :) Anyway, it's just a suggestion. –  kprobst Sep 21 '12 at 20:37
static class Calc {

    public static double FindAverage(int[] numbers) {

        int sum = 0;

        foreach (int number in numbers) {
            sum += number;
        }

        return sum / numbers.Length;
    }
}

You can also do this with Linq easily, but if you're learning it's better to stick with the language basics.

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