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Okay, if I have a string that I want to be equal to something based on multiple conditions, what's the best way to implement that?

Psuedocode

int temp = (either 1, 2, or 3)
string test = (if temp = 1, then "yes") (if temp = 2, then "no") (if temp = 3, then "maybe")

Is there some concise way to do this? What would you do?

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9 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use a switch statement as mentioned in other answers but a dictionary can also be used:

var dictionary = new Dictionary<int, string>();
dictionary.Add(1, "yes");
dictionary.Add(2, "no");
dictionary.Add(3, "maybe");

var test = dictionairy[value];

This method is way more flexible than a switch statement and ever more readable than nested tenary operator statements.

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+1, not concise as asked, but better for future evolutions –  Steve Sep 21 '12 at 20:51
    
+1 for using dictionary... –  LolCoder Sep 21 '12 at 20:58
    
Although I ended up using a switch in my method, I chose this answer because I really love this solution, and I did not know about this. I will be using it in all future implementations of a case like this. –  proseidon Sep 21 '12 at 21:29
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Use a switch

switch(temp)
{
    case 1:
        return "yes";
    case 2:
        return "no";
    case default:
        return "maybe";
}
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string test = GetValue(temp);

public string GetValue(int temp)
{
  switch(temp)
  {
    case 1:
      return "yes";

    case 2:
      return "no";

    case 3:
      return "maybe";

    default:
      throw new ArgumentException("An unrecognized temp value was encountered", "temp");
  }
}
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I think that the approach of throwing the exception. If taken, must go better with an InvalidEnumArgumentException, it adds more context information, don't you think? –  Randolf R-F Sep 21 '12 at 20:35
    
@RandolfR-F Since the argument that was provided is an integer I would stick with the ArgumentException. If the function was accepting an enumeration and switching on that then an InvalidEnumArgumentException would be more appropriate. –  JG in SD Sep 21 '12 at 20:40
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You can use a switch statement

string temp = string.Empty;
switch(value)
{
    case 1:
        temp = "yes";
        break;
    case 2:
        temp = "no";
        break;
    case 3:
        temp = "maybe";
        break;
}
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The basic idea is:

String choices[] = {"yes","no","maybe"};
string test = choices[temp-1];

There are many different ways of actually implementing it. Depending on what your condition variable is, you might like to implement it as some sort of key-value list. SEE Zeebonk's answer for an example.

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How efficient is this in real time?? I mean compared to switch if the need is exactly what the OP asked. –  Ratan Sharma Sep 21 '12 at 20:42
    
Adding options. OP gave a highly useless example, so we don't know what he's really trying to do. Obviously creating an array for a single decision is not the way to go. But some static structure in the class could very well be the way to do it. –  Chris Cudmore Sep 21 '12 at 20:45
    
Got it..thanks.. –  Ratan Sharma Sep 21 '12 at 20:46
    
@RatanSharma If the array was static and readonly it would have approximately no cost, and the cost of each test (one array access) would be about the same as a switch, if not better. –  Servy Sep 21 '12 at 20:52
    
@Servy I fear static for some reason..But that makes sense to me. –  Ratan Sharma Sep 21 '12 at 20:55
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This switch is closer to your pseudocode and is exact C# code:

int temp = /* 1, 2, or 3 */;
string test;
switch(temp)
{
    case 1:
        test = "yes";
        break;
    case 2:
        test = "no";
        break;
    case 3:
        test = "maybe";
        break;
    default:
        test = /* whatever you want as your default, if anything */;
        break;
}

Your pseudocode doesn't include a default case, but it's good practice to include one.

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The most concise answer is the nested ternary operator

string test = (temp == 1 ? "yes" : (temp == 2 ? "no" : (temp == 3 ? "maybe" : "")));

if temp values are only 1,2,3 then

string test = (temp == 1 ? "yes" : (temp == 2 ? "no" : "maybe"));

of course this is the concise answer as asked, and this doesn't means that it is the best. If you could not exclude that, in future you will need more values to test, then it is better to use a dictionary approach as explained in the @zeebonk answer.

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Which would you like to prefer, Multiple ternary operator or switch statement in this scenario? –  LolCoder Sep 21 '12 at 20:39
    
@LolCoder, well, the OP asked for a concise solution, so the ternary operator could be the answer. However, if you anticipate that you will have other values to test in the future, then the ternary operator becomes very unreadable. In that case I prefer the switch statement or, better, the Dictionary approach. –  Steve Sep 21 '12 at 20:46
    
+1 for Dictionary approach....If you would explain those stuff in your answer, I think it'll be very helpful for future reader..... –  LolCoder Sep 21 '12 at 20:50
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the obvious answer would be switch case

but just another flavor:

int temp = x; //either 1,2 or 3

string test = (temp == 1 ? "yes" : temp == 2 ? "no" : "maybe");
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You can also turn things around:

class Program
{
    enum MyEnum
    {
        Yes = 1, 
        No, 
        Maybe
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(MyEnum.Maybe.ToString());
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

This also is more in line that temp can be only 1, 2 or 3. If it's an int compiler won't warn you if temp gets value of 34.

You can also do this:

string GetText(int temp){ 
    return ((MyEnum)temp).ToString();
}

GetText(2) will return "No"

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