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I have a Util class which have some static methods. I want to use spring beans, so i have added few service classes as beans in my util class. As far as i know its not a good practice to use spring beans as a static fields. But is there any way to access spring beans in a static method?

My example:

public class TestUtils {

   private static testBean;

   public void setTestBean(TestBean testBean) {
     TestUtils.testBean = testBean;
   }

  public static String getBeanDetails() {
    return beanName = testBean.getDetails();
  }
}

I had seen in many forms that this is not a best practice, can some one help me how can i handle this type of scenarios?

My xml has below value:

<bean id="testUtils" class="com.test.TestUtils">
 <property name="testBean" ref="testBean" />
</bean>
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5 Answers 5

The result of static methods should depend ONLY on the parameters passed into the method, therefore there is no need to call any bean.

If you need to call another bean then your method should be a member method of a standalone bean.

Other answers give you working solutions, but the fact it can be done doesn't mean that it should be done.

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Yes, I think we should use it as a parameter instead of setting directly in the static class. Based on the standards it says that we should not use the bean as a static though we can do that in different ways as shown in above responses. Thanks for the reply. –  Rosh Sep 23 '12 at 14:16
    
"The result of static methods should depend ONLY on the parameters passed into the method", nice shot! –  Nickolas Feb 10 '14 at 9:46

My approach is for the bean one wishes to access to implement InitializingBean or use @PostConstruct, and containing a static reference to itself.

For example:

@Service
public class MyBean implements InitializingBean {
    private static MyBean instance;

    @Override
    public void afterPropertiesSet() throws Exception {
        instance = this;
    }

    public static MyBean get() {
        return instance;
    }
}

Usage in your static class would therefore just be:

MyBean myBean = MyBean.get();

This way, no XML configuration is required, you don't need to pass the bean in as a constructor argument, and the caller doesn't need to know or care that the bean is wired up using Spring (i.e., no need for messy ApplicationContext variables).

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you may also implement ApplicationContextAware interface, like this:

@Component
public class TestUtils implements ApplicationContextAware {

  private static ApplicationContext ac;

  public static String getBeanDetails() {
    return beanName = ((TestBean) ac.getBean("testBean")).getDetails();
  }

  @Override
  public void setApplicationContext(ApplicationContext ac) {
    this.ac = ac;
  }

}
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This is how I injected from spring for a static field.

<bean id="..." class="...">
 <property name="fieldToBeInjected">
            <util:constant static-field="CONSTANT_FIELD" />
        </property>
</bean>

Maybe this will help you, as well.

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The approach you have outlined is what I have seen being used to inject a Spring bean into a utility class.

<bean id="testUtils" class="com.test.TestUtils">
 <property name="testBean" ref="testBean" />
</bean>

Another option is:

<bean name="methodInvokingFactoryBean" class="org.springframework.beans.factory.config.MethodInvokingFactoryBean">
        <property name="staticMethod" value="TestUtils.setInstance"/>
        <property name="arguments">
            <list>
                <ref bean="testBean"/>
            </list>
       </property>
</bean>

with:

public class TestUtils {

   private static testBean;

   public static void setInstance(TestBean anInstance) {
     testBean = anInstance;
   }

  public static String getBeanDetails() {
    return testBean.getDetails();
  }
}

More details are here and here

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Not clear to me.. Can you plz add the testBean configuration? –  TechSpellBound Oct 19 '13 at 3:16

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