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Question:

(5n^2)(ln(n)) is big-omega of n(ln(n)^2)

What I have tried:

Exist c > 0, n0 > 0

(5n^2)(ln(n)) >= cn(ln(n)^2) for all n >= n0

(5n^2)(ln(n)) >= n(ln(n)) (for n >= 1) >= n(ln(n)^2) (for n <= 1)

so this concludes that when n = 1 = n0, (5n^2)(ln(n)) is big-omega of n(ln(n)^2); but this does not meet the requirement of (for all n >= n0).

I stuck here and can anyone help?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

My first thought:

if

 (5n^2)(ln(n)) is big omega of n(ln(n)^2)

then

 (5n) is big omega of ln(n)

which is fundamental. Look;

exists
    c = 1 and n0 = 1,
such that
    5n >= ln(n); for all n >= n0

Expanding the series for first few elements gives:

 -------------------------
|   n   |   5n   | ln(n)  |
|-------|--------|--------|
|    1  |     5  |  0.00  |
|    2  |    10  |  0.69  |
|    3  |    15  |  1.10  |
|    4  |    20  |  1.39  |
|    5  |    25  |  1.61  |
|   10  |    50  |  2.30  |
|  100  |   500  |  4.61  |
| 1000  |  5000  |  6.91  |
 -------------------------
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i get it! thank you very much! –  GJ. Sep 21 '12 at 21:16

If I understand your notation correctly: For all n>e, n.ln(n)>0, allowing you to change your problem to proving that 5.n is a big omega of ln(n). Obviously you have not only ln(n) = O(n) but also ln(n) = o(n) since lim(ln(n)/n)=0 for n-> infinity. Making me wonder if there is something actually missing from the problem since it's odd to ask if something is big O when it's also little o...

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When a function f(n) is o(g(n)), then always also f(n) is O(g(n)). And when a function f(n) is omega(g(n)), then always also f(n) is Omega(g(n)). –  Krzysztof Jabłoński Sep 21 '12 at 21:23
    
Right, which is precisely why I wrote: "it's odd to ask if something is big O when it's also little o." Not incorrect; just odd. –  Lolo Sep 21 '12 at 21:28
    
I'm not a native speaker, and sometimes I get twisted with english, especially when reading maths or theorems. However it looks like you suggested the same solution as I've done (+1). IMHO you just should think of formatting your posts a little more clearly. –  Krzysztof Jabłoński Sep 21 '12 at 21:37

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