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I want to see the different changesets between to git repositories. The repos are related but neither is the direct origin of the other. In Mercurial, I would just do "hg outgoing other-repo" and "hg incoming other-repo".

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1 Answer 1

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I assume you mean the different changesets between two branches in a repo. In git, you'll have a couple extra steps. Go into one of the repos and do the following

git remote add other OTHER_REPO
git fetch other

Now you can view the differences with one of the following depending on which direction you want to go

# Similar to hg outgoing (changes which in your branch not in the remote) 
git log other/BRANCH_NAME..BRANCH_NAME

# Similar to hg incoming (changes in the remote not in your branch)
git log BRANCH_NAME..other/BRANCH_NAME
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Your assumptionion is correct.Doesn't seem to work. I get –  Stephen Rasku Sep 21 '12 at 21:29
    
If you got an error message, it doesn't seem to have been posted. –  Michael Mior Sep 21 '12 at 21:32
    
To clarify other can be any name you want. OTHER_REPO can be anything you would pass to git clone and BRANCH_NAME should be the name of the branch you're trying to compare. –  Michael Mior Sep 21 '12 at 21:32
    
Sorry, I was trying to edit my answer and I took too long. Your solution works. If you edit your answer to state which is equivalent to "hg incoming" and "hg outgoing" I will accept your answer. –  Stephen Rasku Sep 21 '12 at 21:37
    
@StephenRasku Done. You may find git-utils useful. If you put the executables in your path, you'll have git incoming and git outgoing that work like the commands above but just use the default branch and remote. –  Michael Mior Sep 21 '12 at 21:46

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