Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have question will the click event or any other event run in document.ready() for the first time? I mean will it reach after loading DOM elements to the comment without clicking first time? :)

$(document).ready(
  $(#foo).click( 
   function()
    {
       // "It reached here after DOM is loaded!"
    }
  )
)
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

document.ready fires when the DOM is fully loaded, so you would be correct.

The 'click' event, however, will not fire unless the bound element is clicked or the click event is explicitly called using click() or Events/trigger:

$('#foo').click();
$('#foo').trigger("click");

Have you read the manual page for document.ready? See:

http://docs.jquery.com/Tutorials:Introducing_$(document).ready()

share|improve this answer

No, the function will not be executed.

There are a few errors:

$(document).ready() takes a function as an argument. '#foo' should also be a string.

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('#foo').click( 
   function()
    {
       // "It reached here after DOM is loaded!"
    }
  )
})

If you want the function to be evaluated at least once, after the dom loads. Then probably the easiest way is to name your function.

eg:

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('#foo').click( 
   function myfunction()
    {
       // "It reached here after DOM is loaded!"
    }
  );
  myfunction();
})


If you need the function to execute in the scope of $('#foo') you can do so with Function.call() method.

eg:

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('#foo').click( 
   function myfunction()
    {
       // "It reached here after DOM is loaded!"
    }
  );
  myfunction.call($('foo'));
})

That would make it behave more like as it were triggered by a DOM event. I'm sure JQuery has a specific method of triggering an event registered through it's DOM event functions. It would also be an option to use that as it would probably also emulate the Event Object passed to "myfunction".

share|improve this answer

To generalize the question, JavaScript events are handled by associating an event type (onclick, onkeyup, onfocuse, etc) with a function (or multiple functions). The function is, of course, parsed, but is not evaluated until the associated event occurs. Also, the "function," in this context, is often referred to as an event handler or event callback.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.