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I have a file with some duplicate entries. It looks like

Los Angeles, 6
Los Angeles, 6 
New York, 31
New York, 31
New YOrk, 31
.
.
.

Now I want to get rid of the duplicate data. What I try to do is to use each_line, see if the line equals to the next line, if they are the same then just skip, and write to a new file. The problem is how should I get the next line of that file? Or any other suggestions to do this?

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are duplicates always consecutive? –  tokland Sep 21 '12 at 22:06
    
Have you written any code? We'd like to see it because fixing your code is a lot easier than writing something from scratch and helping you integrate it. Also, if you're on Linux, look at the uniq command. From its man page: Filter adjacent matching lines from INPUT (or standard input), writing to OUTPUT (or standard output). –  the Tin Man Sep 21 '12 at 23:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Comparing against the next line is unnecessary, since you can easily see if the current line matches the previous one:

file = File.open("filename", "r")
previous_line = nil
file.each_line { |line|
   if line == previous_line
     # duplicate line; ignore
   else
     # different; do whatever you want
   end

   # remember this line so we can compare against it
   previous_line = line
}
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1  
Rather than opening and storing the file handle, then iterating using each_line, do it the Ruby way, and use File.foreach. –  the Tin Man Sep 21 '12 at 23:21

If the duplicates are always consecutive, willglynn's solution works. Otherwise, I think the best way is to throw them into a hash.

unique_list = {}

File.foreach(filename) do |line|
  unique_list[line] = 1
end

unique_list.each do |line|
  new_file.print line
end
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I'd write:

lines = open("file.txt").lines.chunk(&:downcase).map { |s, ss| ss.first }

If files are big, use gem enumerable-lazy:

require 'enumerable/lazy'
lines = open("file.txt").lines.chunk(&:downcase).lazy.map { |s, ss| ss.first }

Substitute downcase for the function by which you decide which strings are equivalent.

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1  
As a word of warning, this isn't a scalable solution. Large files will be pulled into memory before being able to do anything with them. –  the Tin Man Sep 21 '12 at 23:31
    
@theTinMan: that's easily solvable, everything until the map is lazy, so we can either use gem enumerable/lazy to do a lazy map or start processing with each. –  tokland Sep 22 '12 at 12:25

If you can do this from shell instead of with Ruby, and you are working in *nix, it gets easier. There's a *nix tool called uniq that is made for this.

Given your sample input, in file input.txt:

Los Angeles, 6
Los Angeles, 6
New York, 31
New York, 31
New YOrk, 31

Then this command will remove adjacent duplicates and print the result to standard-out:

$ uniq input.txt
Los Angeles, 6
New York, 31
New YOrk, 31

You will notice that the typo in the third instance of "New York" caused it to not be recognized as a duplicate.

To send the result to another file:

$ uniq input.txt >output.txt
$ cat output.txt
Los Angeles, 6
New York, 31
New YOrk, 31

To modify the original file, you can't redirect the output of uniq to it--you would be clobbering the input that uniq is reading. Instead, use a temporary file:

$ uniq input.txt >input.txt.tmp && cp input.txt.tmp input.txt
$ cat input.txt
Los Angeles, 6
New York, 31
New YOrk, 31
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