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I want to count requests by certain attributes and summarize them by a certain time period (probably by the second) and then have running averages/max/min for last 10 seconds, last 2 minutes, etc.

The obvious (to me) approach is to just have a list of seconds and when I need the moving/running average then just go back in the list the appropriate amount of time and calculate the average. Other than some obvious optimizations around storing aggregated values to use for the longer time periods, what ideas am I missing?

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2 Answers 2

I'm not really familiar with Go, so please excuse any strangeness in the following code. Adding an element to the rolling average should be O(1) in time. It uses O(n) in memory (a fixed amount).

package main

import "fmt"

func rolling(n int) func(float64) float64 {
        bins := make([]float64, n)
        average := 0.0
        i := 0
        return func(x float64) float64 {
                average += (x - bins[i]) / float64(n)
                bins[i] = x
                i = (i + 1) % n
                return average
        }
}

func main() {
        add := rolling(5)
        add(1)
        add(2)
        add(3)
        add(4)
        fmt.Println("(1+2+3+4+5          ) / 5 =", add(5))
        fmt.Println("(  2+3+4+5+9        ) / 5 =", add(9))
        fmt.Println("(    3+4+5+9+3      ) / 5 =", add(3))
        fmt.Println("(      4+5+9+3+0    ) / 5 =", add(0))
        fmt.Println("(        5+9+3+0-9  ) / 5 =", add(-9))
        fmt.Println("(          9+3+0-9-8) / 5 =", add(-8))
}

Output:

$ go run roll.go
(1+2+3+4+5          ) / 5 = 3
(  2+3+4+5+9        ) / 5 = 4.6
(    3+4+5+9+3      ) / 5 = 4.8
(      4+5+9+3+0    ) / 5 = 4.2
(        5+9+3+0-9  ) / 5 = 1.6
(          9+3+0-9-8) / 5 = -1
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I prefer exponential moving average as it is simpler and does not require to keep values in array

Here is function I used in past

func MovingExpAvg(value, oldValue, fdtime, ftime float64) float64 {
  alpha := 1.0 - math.Exp(-fdtime/ftime)
  r := alpha * value + (1.0 - alpha) * oldValue
  return r
}

and code example

http://play.golang.org/p/OZ25cwKMnT

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That's clever. I like it. –  Snowball Sep 23 '12 at 7:11
    
yeah, I like it too! It seems like I can't add data more often than 'ftime', is that right? (When I just add "1.0" each time I have a data point and specify the (very brief) interval then the value just ends up being 1 after a little while. –  Ask Bjørn Hansen Sep 24 '12 at 19:00
    
I tried it in my application now (adding data every second). Another goroutine is setting newCount as data comes in, I put the relevant code and the output at gist.github.com/3777867 --- I think for my use the averages aren't accurate enough unfortunately. For instance in the sample run, the last 10 seconds have an actual average of 6227, but the moving average calculated it to 5570. Or am I doing something wrong? –  Ask Bjørn Hansen Sep 24 '12 at 19:38
    
You can have any period of time. fdtime is time period. ftime shows how fast it reacts on changes. You can add data more often then ftime. Play with it in Play ground You can edit code and press Run. –  Max Sep 24 '12 at 19:49

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